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  • OleBoot
    OleBoot Posts: 2,412
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    The Kaiser....good for trips into Poland ?

    Probably, but wrong war.
  • jdjohn
    jdjohn Posts: 3,067
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    I took this pic several years ago. On the side of the truck, it said "Stool Bus #2".
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    "This may not matter to you, but it does to me for various reasons, many of them illogical or irrational, but the vinyl hobby is not really logical or rational..." - member on Vinyl Engine
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  • SCompRacer
    SCompRacer Posts: 8,408
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    Salk SoundScape 8's * Audio Research Reference 3 * Bottlehead Eros Phono * Park's Audio Budgie SUT * Krell KSA-250 * Harmonic Technology Pro 9+ * Signature Series Sonore Music Server w/Deux PS * Roon * Gustard R26 DAC / Singxer SU-6 DDC * Heavy Plinth Lenco L75 Idler Drive * AA MG-1 Linear Air Bearing Arm * AT33PTG/II & Denon 103R * Richard Gray 600S * NHT B-12d subs * GIK Acoustic Treatments * Sennheiser HD650 *
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 18,686
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    With both of them, hopefully? 😃

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • msg
    msg Posts: 9,880
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    OleBoot wrote: »
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    Pretty sure that's @Toolfan66 down there.
    I disabled signatures.
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 18,686
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    Livin' life bro'! No worries. 😁

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • TEAforONE
    TEAforONE Posts: 1,023
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    Stolen from X
    See my profile for list of gear.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,367
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    Saw this yesterday parked in front of the local garage in our wee village.

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    It was running, too. Not very smoothly :# -- but it was running.
    I did have the presence of mind to ask the fellow in the driver's seat if he was OK with my taking a few photos (which he was). He was warming it up for his wife -- it car's "her rig", said he. B)

  • OleBoot
    OleBoot Posts: 2,412
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    Horrible little cars. Always thought so.
  • msg
    msg Posts: 9,880
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    What were those cars like compared to others in their time? Were they faster than other stuff, or any particular handling characteristics that made them desirable? The MGs I came across never seemed to be running properly and were awkward getting in and out of. The midget version, whatever it's real name is, had an incredibly tight engine compartment. Looked difficult to work on.

    Are they just one of those quirky vehicles that are enjoyed for their eccentricities?
    I disabled signatures.
  • OleBoot
    OleBoot Posts: 2,412
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    The MGB was the first MG "sports car" that wasn't a sports car and was put together from the BMC parts bin. The MGA was the last MG that was a real MG even though it too contained some BMC parts. The MGB was neither fast nor handled very well. Compared to contemporary sports cars (Lotus, TVR, Austin Healey and even Triumph) it was a clunker.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,367
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    Fairly inexpensive (in the US), though, so always popular.
    They looked the part of the classic British sports car. Well, until they got the compliant big rubber bumper(s).
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    There's one of these (ca. 1974 or 75) for sale, in BRG, not two miles from the spot where I photographed that BGT (FWIW). B)

  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,367
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    oh, they did this, too, to comply with the "5 mph bumper" laws, too, apparently. :#
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  • soundfreak1
    soundfreak1 Posts: 3,406
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    All above is true.....but they (when right) they were fun to drive! And cheep.
    Main Rig:
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  • nooshinjohn
    nooshinjohn Posts: 25,262
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    All above is true.....but they (when right) they were fun to PUSH ! And cheep.

    Fixed.😇🤣🤣🤣

    The Gear... Carver "Statement" Mono-blocks, Mcintosh C2300 Arcam AVR20, Oppo UDP-203 4K Blu-ray player, Sony XBR70x850B 4k, Polk Audio Legend L800 with height modules, L400 Center Channel Polk audio AB800 "in-wall" surrounds. Marantz MM7025 stereo amp. Simaudio Moon 680d DSD

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  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,367
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  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 24,950
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    Those little cars were fun to prank your neighbors with. 6 of us kids pushed one around back of the neighbors house and picked it up and put it on his deck. He was TORKED to say the least.
    Mind you decks of that era 1978-80 were mostly not much more than a foot off the ground and had no fancy railings or bench seats.

    I also know from experience that if you rev up a Austin Healey and dump the clutch you will snap the rear axle. Yea that was not a fun fix! Especially with the owner standing over me barking his PO'd ness in my ears, man those had tiny axles 😁😁
  • F1nut
    F1nut Posts: 50,098
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    The MGB can be highly modified. Dropping a V8 in turns it into a rocketship.
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    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


    President of Club Polk

  • OleBoot
    OleBoot Posts: 2,412
    edited May 18
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    There were factory 6 cylinder (MGC) and V8 (MGB GT V8) versions. The MGC had a really heavy engine and the car just basically followed the engine around, often bearing no relation to where the wheels were pointed. The V8 used a Rover (ex Buick) aluminum engine that was in fact lighter than the 4 banger. It wasn't a bad car (apart from all the normal British Leyland faults like bits falling off) but the motor produced vey little power for a V8. As for modded MGBs, anything goes of course like all cars.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,367
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    Knew a kid in high school (Royce Hoffmeister) who had a Ford Cortina with a Ford V8 (289 or 302 -- memory's hazy at this point) shoehorned in it. The car was terrifying.
  • msg
    msg Posts: 9,880
    edited May 18
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    OleBoot wrote: »
    There were factory 6 cylinder (MGC) and V8 (MGB GT V8) versions. The MGC had a really heavy engine and the car just basically followed the engine around, often bearing no relation to where the wheels were pointed. The V8 used a Rover (ex Buick) aluminum engine that was in fact lighter than the 4 banger. It wasn't a bad car (apart from all the normal British Leyland faults like bits falling off) but the motor produced vey little power for a V8. As for modded MGBs, anything goes of course like all cars.
    Informative, and funny as well.

    I can appreciate some mods and restoration/maintenance work keeping an older vehicle on the road. Sometimes it's not even about doing this with something worthy of mass appeal, but just in keeping up something meaningful to the owner.

    This is why I was wondering if there's anything special about these cars to the people who own(ed) them. To me, the drivers are some combination of particular features that are unique, the driving experiences they offer, or just plain nostalgia, and the memories and feelings old vehicles can evoke. It's these things that, for me, build appreciation for the brand in these vehicles' respective eras of design and use.
    I disabled signatures.
  • msg
    msg Posts: 9,880
    edited May 18
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    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    Knew a kid in high school (Royce Hoffmeister) who had a Ford Cortina with a Ford V8 (289 or 302 -- memory's hazy at this point) shoehorned in it. The car was terrifying.
    I hope it was one of those situations where it had drum brakes all the way around, as well?
    I disabled signatures.
  • OleBoot
    OleBoot Posts: 2,412
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    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    Knew a kid in high school (Royce Hoffmeister) who had a Ford Cortina with a Ford V8 (289 or 302 -- memory's hazy at this point) shoehorned in it. The car was terrifying.

    There was a guy called Jeff Uren who produced the Cortina Savage with an Essex Ford V6 for the Mk II. These were fully sorted and really good an desirable cars. The king of the hill was a Cortina Savage based on a Cortina 1600E. The 1600E in standard Ford form had a Cortina GT engine with the Lotus Cortina suspension and a luxury interior with leather and wood dashboard. It was well sought after in standard form, but the 1600E Savage with the V6 was Ford Cortina Nirvana.

    Cortina 1600E interior:

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