Spiked my speakers... and didn’t like

Weird, thought this would be a cool thing. I have replaced the metal gliders with some nice brass spikes on my speakers

Surprisingly, came to find out that my kid’s godmother piano recordings sounded bit off.

She’s a professional pianist, I have listed her playing for ages and I am familiar enough with her piano sound.

Maybe, a bit less realism and warmth compared with actual instrument sound?!
«134

Comments

  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 23,421
    well, there you go, then.
    1) you can't believe everything you read*
    2) you can't beat empiricism.

    B)

    ______________
    * except point 1) above, of course! You can believe that -- otherwise it'd be a metaphysical conundrum.
  • SIHABSIHAB Posts: 1,516
    I spiked my speakers and vocals sounded slurred. :o
  • VR3VR3 Posts: 23,480
    There's a Katie perry song here
    - Not Tom

    Vr3Mods.com ///// Version3Audio.com

    "No, that's silly talk. Dude, you can't possibly be this audio dumb so quit the act." - Doro
  • verbverb Posts: 8,001
    Interesting. Makes me wonder. Manufacturers design their products (I know we do) knowing that the structural harmonics will never be completely eliminated. In fact it's impossible. So we take those harmonics into account, and design around it. We tune the structure so that the natural frequency, or other undesirable harmonics are never realized by a customer under normal operating conditions.

    I imagine the same holds true for Speaker manufacturers. Tuning the structures to the point of a nice balance (or compromise) to achieve the desired acoustic performance.

    Then, if any of those variables are altered (spikes), you get a change in performance, better or worse. Interesting. Something to ponder on a Sunday morning. :smile:
    Basement: Polk SDA SRS, Cary SLP-05 Pre, Enlightened Audio Designs CD Transport, Northstar Designs Excelsio DAC, Silnote Morpheus Ref2 Digital Cable, Marantz SA-14 SACD, McIntosh MC300 Amp, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Pangea Power Cables, Wireworld Oasis 8 RCA IC's, MIT Shotgun S3 IC's, MIT Shotgun S1 Bi-Wire speaker cables
    Office: PC, EAR Acute CD Player, EAR 834L Pre, PASS ACA Monoblocks, Denon UDR-F10 Cassette, Acoustic Technologies Classic FR Speakers, SVS SB12 Plus sub, MIT AVt2 speaker cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable, Groneberg Quatro Reference IC's
    Spare Room: , Antique Sound Labs Wave AV-8 Monoblocks, Tisbury Mini Passive Pre, Tjoeb 99 tube CD player (modified Marantz CD-38), Analysis Plus Oval 9's, Zu Jumpers, AudioEngine B1 Streamer, Klipsch RB-61 v2, SVS PB1000 sub, Blue Jeans RCA IC's
    Living Room: Peachtree Nova Integrated, Cambridge CXN v2 Streamer, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Polk RT265 In Wall Speakers, Polk DSW Pro 660wi sub
  • B67B67 Posts: 3
    Hi,

    I did something else because with spikes the sound was not sounding like it used to be. I put some svs soundpath under RTI A7. The sound was more open and the placement of the instruments were incredible. hzeat5q1eqxx.jpg

    Also with my Audyssey changed some things.
    You see first reading 11-05-2018
    After reading: 16-3-2019 - bi-amp was the same reading as the normal speaker connection. Look at my screen shot:ihrhxpo3nw8n.jpg


  • corticocortico Posts: 589
    edited April 28
    also, listened some unedited electric guitar recordings made on the same room, and amp cabinet low frequency resonances plus other harmonics sounded cleaner but unnatural...

    Could be a taste thing, I’m under the impression that the un-spiked speakers sounds better to me, on my specific set up... :)
  • afterburntafterburnt Posts: 5,813
    @cortico what speakers do you have?
  • corticocortico Posts: 589
    afterburnt wrote: »
    @cortico what speakers do you have?

    I have the a recently recapped Polk Audio LS70 recapped pair.
  • Toolfan66Toolfan66 Posts: 14,274
    F1nut wrote: »
    That is odd, every time I've spiked speakers or stands the mids cleared up and the bass got tighter.

    Agreed!!!
  • corticocortico Posts: 589
    Exactly, that’s is what I found.

    Although, that is cool, I find it cleaned the mojo out of some recordings, where the “flaws” help to render the sound more realistically.

    As an example, fender tweed amp cabinet flatulence/speaker cone breakup when overdriven by a bass heavy guitar, or piano solo played by an heavy left handed pianist.... these sound more convincing with the metal gliders, “I find” :#
  • kharp1kharp1 Posts: 3,391
    I spiked my wife's drink last night and she sounded amazing. 🎩

    That's some funny Schiit!
    Main System:
    Joule-Electra LA 100 MKIII Upgraded by Rich Brkich Pre
    Butler Audio TBD 2250 Amp
    PS Audio DirectStream DAC and MemoryPlayer Transport
    LSA-1 Statement
    SVS SB4000 & SB2000
    Wireworld Equinox 7 bi-wire, Wireworld Silver Eclipse 7 IC

    Secondary Rig:
    Parasound P5, Audio Electronics by Cary Constellation
    Marsh a200s, Audio Elecrtonics by Cary Hercules
    Pioneer Elite DV-45a, Denon DVD-2910
    Klipsch Epic CF-1, Vandersteen 3CE sig
    Analysus Plus Oval

    Backup Gear:
    Pass Labs Aleph 30, McCormack DNA-125, Parasound A21
    Marantz SA-14S1
    Usher CP-6311/Tyler Acoustics Taylo Reference Monitor, LSA-1
  • steveinazsteveinaz Posts: 19,061
    On a slab home with a hard surfaced floor (ie, tile) I prefer rubber feet on speakers.
  • DSkipDSkip Posts: 16,212
    I wanted to elaborate more on this. This scenario also plays into my personal 'foundation' that I like to have - room, cables, and rack. In this case, the rack extends to the speakers as they are a component in your system just like any other. The grounding pathways created remove those resonances from ALL of your components and prevents you from hearing the material a component is made from vs. the actual sound it creates.

    If you get the foundation right, it becomes much easier to evaluate gear and know exactly what each piece is bringing to the table. Its kind of like a pitcher with horrible form in baseball - if you don't correct it early, it becomes even more difficult to correct later. During the correction phase it also becomes much worse than if you had not touched it. It doesn't mean the bad form is correct, but when your entire play style (or system) is built around it, it can greatly inhibit any actual progress.
  • joecoulsonjoecoulson Posts: 3,586
    The only time I have found spikes did not help was with the SVS SB16. I tried multiple spike setups, flat on carpet and with the rubber feet it came with. I then got the iso pads that were cheap from Amaz.. wasn’t until I put the SVS soundpath on there that it became less boomy and overpowering. But I am on a sunken floor crawl space (sub floor) which does not help.
    The help tremendously with the towers.
    Auralic Vega G1/Rega TT/Denon SACD - Parasound P6 - PS Audio M700x2 - Elac Adante AF-61
  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,820
    Are your speakers on carpet or hard floors?

    Spikes are meant to isolate the speaker by reducing the contact patch so that the heaviest bass waves don't transfer to the floor and vibrate everything around them. This, thereby, reduces the resonances in your listening space. This keeps those resonances from overshadowing the mids and highs which can be easily over-powered by large woofers. It also keeps those resonances from causing reflections that will cancel out mids and highs. This is why spikes can make a speaker sound more "open". All they are really doing is unmuddying the waters, so to speak.

    Spikes work best on carpets where the carpet can work adversely against your typical rubber isolation feet and actually transfer more energy than they prevent.

    But if you use spikes on a hard floor with no damping like a carpet and subsequent padding would provide, you can lack enough friction to keep the speaker from making micro-vibrations on the floor surface. This can cause energy reflections back into the speaker structure because the contact point is overwhelmed by the energy trying to get through it and it loads and unloads like a spring. This is why many people who use spikes on hard floors also use speaker spike isolation cups. They will absorb and quell those micro-vibrations by giving the spikes the damping they need to dissipate that energy.
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
  • corticocortico Posts: 589
    Hey, Dskip thanks for taking time bringing light to this.

    The rig sounds pretty good (at least, I think so, haha), I am not feeling that there's anything wrong with it.

    Some recordings, gliders presented a better rendering, especially if I am familiar with it. On other listening materials, spikes seemed better.

    I am sure my house construction comes into play, 130 years brownstone building wood joist slabs, narrow compartments, high ceilings...

    Either way good tones! I guess this comes down to a tone preference.

  • RandyCroissantRandyCroissant Posts: 417
    I hope this helps some folks here, I had two black quartz slabs made up for my 1Cs with adjustable spikes ( you can't see them under the slabs) however I noticed an improvement in the mid and bass after the mod I would describe it as a little more defined. I went with this approach so they would be easier to move around when needed.
    Yamaha RXA1030, Yamaha CD, Bluesound node 2i, Tidal
    Polk SDA2btl highly modded
    Polk SDA 1C
    Polk CS350 LS x2
    Polk m5jr
    Kimber 8TC
    Sony 55" Bravia
    Wish list SVS sub

  • RandyCroissantRandyCroissant Posts: 417
    To add the speakers sit nice and solid, with the adjustable spikes they are dead level as well:)
    Yamaha RXA1030, Yamaha CD, Bluesound node 2i, Tidal
    Polk SDA2btl highly modded
    Polk SDA 1C
    Polk CS350 LS x2
    Polk m5jr
    Kimber 8TC
    Sony 55" Bravia
    Wish list SVS sub

  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,820
    DSkip wrote: »
    John your comment is surprisingly incorrect. Spikes do the exact opposite of isolating. They are coupling devices through and through.

    Physics says you're wrong, champ.
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,820
    edited May 1
    Also, since nobody ever thinks I have a clue about what I'm talking about, here's a link to the first Google search result when you ask Google "how do speaker spikes work":

    https://ledgernote.com/blog/q-and-a/speaker-spikes/
    Foam pads go between your speakers and your desk, stands, or floor to decouple the two and then collect and dissipate any vibrations. ... The goal of spikes under your speakers is to decouple them from the next surface. The goal of spikes under your stands is to couple them to the floor by anchoring into it.


    de·cou·ple
    /dēˈkəpəl/
    verb
    - separate, disengage, or dissociate (something) from something else.
    "the mountings effectively decouple movements of the engine from those of the wheels"

    - make the interaction between (electrical components) so weak that there is little transfer of energy between them, especially to remove unwanted AC distortion or oscillations in circuits with a common power supply.

    Seems like isolation to me. But, what do I know? Me and my stupid engineering degree! Pfft! Like any of that matters!
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
  • DSkipDSkip Posts: 16,212
    Please explain to me exactly how a spike decouples. I’m not picking a fight here.

    Spikes create pathways for energy to travel. This in effect is a coupling mechanism.
  • corticocortico Posts: 589
    edited May 1
    @Jstas it may sound confusing, because it depends on the application. Spikes on a speaker will couple the speaker with the floor, there’s a controversial debate of the effects of coupling and decoupling speakers.
  • kharp1kharp1 Posts: 3,391
    Jstas wrote: »
    Also, since nobody ever thinks I have a clue about what I'm talking about, here's a link to the first Google search result when you ask Google "how do speaker spikes work":

    https://ledgernote.com/blog/q-and-a/speaker-spikes/

    I can find so many things wrong, or arguable, in that article there's not enough room here to list them all. Mainly, its apparent the guy isn't an audio guy and obviously hasn't thoroughly followed and experimented for his answers. He references what he's read on internet forums as a basis for some things stating that some have spent $10k on cones only to find a phone book or rotten log from the back yard just as good. Based off that statement I'd say that's why people here think you never have a clue. Your words, not mine.
    Main System:
    Joule-Electra LA 100 MKIII Upgraded by Rich Brkich Pre
    Butler Audio TBD 2250 Amp
    PS Audio DirectStream DAC and MemoryPlayer Transport
    LSA-1 Statement
    SVS SB4000 & SB2000
    Wireworld Equinox 7 bi-wire, Wireworld Silver Eclipse 7 IC

    Secondary Rig:
    Parasound P5, Audio Electronics by Cary Constellation
    Marsh a200s, Audio Elecrtonics by Cary Hercules
    Pioneer Elite DV-45a, Denon DVD-2910
    Klipsch Epic CF-1, Vandersteen 3CE sig
    Analysus Plus Oval

    Backup Gear:
    Pass Labs Aleph 30, McCormack DNA-125, Parasound A21
    Marantz SA-14S1
    Usher CP-6311/Tyler Acoustics Taylo Reference Monitor, LSA-1
Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!