Do Coax design Analog Interconnects work better?

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Hello everyone,
I was reading and listening to some of the people in the industry and I was informed that Coax design analog cables are the best overall design for sending analog singls. The resistance I always thought was a bit high as I thought it was supposed to be around 45-50 ohms vs true 75 ohms which is what coax designed cables are. I also was told that Twisted pair is not ideal which just about every single pair of analog cables are made out of.
So anyone explore these designs?

Honestly , Blue Jeans cables makes Coax designed cables for analog. I don't see many others , I think Tributaries also used a Coax design, I'll have to cut one of mine open to see if that is true or not. It's been many years since I fooled around with Tributaries cables.
Dan
My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
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  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    The Best designed cable for passing Subwoofer information especially longer distances is a Coax designed cable. Both my subwoofers are wired with Carbon Audioquest RG6 designed cable.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    Last thought as I just gotta do it, I have plenty of analog cables laying all over the place of different levels even going back to Monster cable M series . I have digital coax cables I could use to test with and I could build some Audioquest Carbon , forest and I think I have something else, I'll have to look.

    My question is this, if coax design is the better choice, than why wouldn't everyone use it? It makes no sense to use twisted pair if it's a flawed design for sending analog signals. I'm wondering if there is some bull crap in this , I'd like to know.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • VR3
    VR3 Posts: 28,304
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    I don't believe I have ever had a coax design interconnect. I feel the most popular idea right now is multiple runs wire per leg plus an added shielding
    - Not Tom ::::::: Any system can play Diana Krall. Only the best can play Limp Bizkit.
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 24,924
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    I've made many. The wire I used mostly was Canare RG6 with the special Canare RCA ends. IIRC I believe it was @Speedskater who turned me on to the idea approximately 16 yrs or more ago. He was a big proponent of them.
    I sold my Audioquest Diamondbacks after I made them to @polkfarmboy. The downside is you need extra room behind your gear for the non-flexibility of the coax. It takes much more room to make the bend. I'm almost positive I still have several of them in my big box O' cables.
    I was on a kick to try all kinds of homemade interconnects at the time.
    I bought some good different jacket color wire braided them together and soldered Cardas RCA's to it. They all had their own sound. Frank at signal cable obliged me and sent some short scraps of different wire he had to recycle for my fun time. All I had to do was pay shipping.
  • jbreezy5
    jbreezy5 Posts: 1,141
    edited January 2023
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    All of the Philips PXT1000 are coax design, whether analog or digital cables.

    I attempted to oust these with Wireworld Oasis which set me back about $450, I think. The WW are designed more like how you mentioned most analog interconnects to be designed.

    The PXT1000 stayed and I returned the WW, because tonal color and texture were superior on the Philips all of which I got for under $20 (!) on eBay.

    The WW did have a bigger soundstage.

    I have since splurged on a Kimber Kable coax cable (DV30) and it does get the nod over PXT1000, but at a reasonable premium.

    The KK is more detailed, and bass hits harder and better defined, but a little less forgiving of bad recordings. Philips a little warmer.

    I like both of these better than my BJC analog interconnects. BJC offers my favorite Toslink cable however.

    The only real way to answer your question is to do a comparison in your system. I could have never understood the differences mentioned above without firsthand experience.
    CD Players: Sony CDP-211; Sony DVP-S9000ES; Sony UDP-X800M2 (x2); Cambridge Audio CXC

    DACs: Jolida Glass FX Tube DAC III (x2); Denafrips Ares II (x2)

    Streamers: ROKU (x3); Bluesound Node 2i and Node N130 w/LHY LPS // Receivers: Yamaha RX-V775BT; Yamaha RX-V777

    Preamps: B&K Ref 50; B&K Ref 5 S2; Classe CP-800 MkII; Audio Research SP16L (soon)

    Amps: Niles SI-275; B&K ST125.7; B&K ST125.2; Classe CA-2300; Butler Audio TDB-5150

    Speakers: Boston Acoustics CR55; Focal Chorus 705v; Wharfedale Diamond 10.2; Monitor Audio Silver-1; Def Tech Mythos One (x4)/Mythos Three Center (x2)/Mythos Two pr.; Martin Logan Electromotion ESL; Legacy Audio Victoria/Silverscreen Center; Gallo Acoustics Reference 3.1; SVS SB-1000 Pro; REL HT-1003; B&W ASW610; HifiMan HE400i

    Turntable: Dual 721 Direct-Drive w/Audio Technica AT-VM95e cart

    Cables: Tripp-lite 14ga. PCs, Blue Jeans Cable ICs, Philips PXT1000 ICs; Kimber Kable DV30 coaxial ICs; Canare L-4E6S XLR ICs; Kimber Kable 8PR & 8TC speaker cables.
  • jbreezy5
    jbreezy5 Posts: 1,141
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    fixo5xjc6ejm.jpeg

    Above is an image of the Philips PXT1000 cable design and explanation of materials in the design. Very competitive with more costly name brands.

    Forgot to mention earlier that I also preferred these to Kimber Kable Hero analog interconnects; at first I thought I loved them, but ended up sending them back!

    So, IME, I would say thus far I do prefer the coax designed analog interconnects to the twisted pair analog interconnect designs.

    I intend to try some other affordable analog interconnect offerings from Analysis Plus, AQ, and Pangea, but that is a bit on the back-burner right now.
    CD Players: Sony CDP-211; Sony DVP-S9000ES; Sony UDP-X800M2 (x2); Cambridge Audio CXC

    DACs: Jolida Glass FX Tube DAC III (x2); Denafrips Ares II (x2)

    Streamers: ROKU (x3); Bluesound Node 2i and Node N130 w/LHY LPS // Receivers: Yamaha RX-V775BT; Yamaha RX-V777

    Preamps: B&K Ref 50; B&K Ref 5 S2; Classe CP-800 MkII; Audio Research SP16L (soon)

    Amps: Niles SI-275; B&K ST125.7; B&K ST125.2; Classe CA-2300; Butler Audio TDB-5150

    Speakers: Boston Acoustics CR55; Focal Chorus 705v; Wharfedale Diamond 10.2; Monitor Audio Silver-1; Def Tech Mythos One (x4)/Mythos Three Center (x2)/Mythos Two pr.; Martin Logan Electromotion ESL; Legacy Audio Victoria/Silverscreen Center; Gallo Acoustics Reference 3.1; SVS SB-1000 Pro; REL HT-1003; B&W ASW610; HifiMan HE400i

    Turntable: Dual 721 Direct-Drive w/Audio Technica AT-VM95e cart

    Cables: Tripp-lite 14ga. PCs, Blue Jeans Cable ICs, Philips PXT1000 ICs; Kimber Kable DV30 coaxial ICs; Canare L-4E6S XLR ICs; Kimber Kable 8PR & 8TC speaker cables.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,348
    edited January 2023
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    It's not resistance but impedance that's the "figure of merit" for signal transmission cables.
    There are plenty of 50 ohm coaxial cables on the market. RG58 being a classic example (that, and the larger diameter RG-8, were the standard cables used for CB radio BITD).

    Here's what turns up from Belden for 50 ohm coax, e.g.
    https://www.belden.com/products/cable/coax-triax-cable/50-ohm-coax-cable#sort=@catalogitemwebdisplaypriority ascending&numberOfResults=25

    For the frequency range of (analog) audio signals, the impedance is pretty much moot. The biggest issue with most coax is its inflexibility, but there are more flexible coaxial cables available from the likes of (e.g.) Mogami.
  • EndersShadow
    EndersShadow Posts: 17,556
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    Interesting as I have one of those Phillips from good ol pepster…..

    I’m personally a fan of Douglas Connections ICs ( @helipilotdoug ) and KimberKable Hero (and PBJ).

    I had some Signal cable but passed them on because their connection pulled the ground off my amp lol….

    I also have some of the ICs from @pitdogg2….

    Best sub cable I ever used was Audioquest Black Thunder….

    Best coaxial I’d used is BlackCat Veloce…… BNC w RCA adapters.
    "....not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." William Bruce Cameron, Informal Sociology: A Casual Introduction to Sociological Thinking (1963)
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 24,924
    edited January 2023
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    I've not used any of those Belden cables Doc listed. I've experimented with the 1694a.
    @SeleniumFalcon made some interconnects for me out of IIRC RG62 solid copper conductor that is floated within the dielectric with a teflon strand. Those were excellent. Unfortunately Ken had an old stash and all I could find in it was copper clad steel at the time.
    Correct if I'm wrong Ken, it was a long time ago lol
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,348
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    They like steel in coax for its structural 'backbone'. For high frequency signals (most RF) the skin effect means the signal's traveling on the outside of the conductor, so it's fine. Not great for analog audio. Maybe OK for digital, but then again maybe not great.
    Pretty sure there are still some pure copper center conductor coax available.

    Any bulk coax at my house is quite vintage. :#

  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    https://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/audio/index.htm
    Read over this and see what you think. Again not promoting the brand or any brand, just thinking about this design compared to basically most other companies. Again IF coax design is the best design, why would anyone use anything else?
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • Clipdat
    Clipdat Posts: 12,775
    edited January 2023
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  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    I have a spool of full pure copper Liberity RG59U cable in my stock. We use to use it for Antennas, long subwoofer runs and Digital Coax cables. It always worked very well. I should have some Liberity RG59U RCA ends laying around somewhere. I'm gonna when I have some spare time, terminate a few pairs and have at it. It's copper center copper shielding .
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • Clipdat
    Clipdat Posts: 12,775
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    I predict it will sound good. Let us know.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,348
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    Clipdat wrote: »
    https://forum.polkaudio.com/discussion/192523/mogami-2964-digital-coaxial-cable-75-ohm

    Still recommend Mogami coax cable. Sounds good to my ears. Shrug.

    You have chosen wisely and well. :)
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 24,924
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    mantis wrote: »
    https://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/audio/index.htm
    Read over this and see what you think. Again not promoting the brand or any brand, just thinking about this design compared to basically most other companies. Again IF coax design is the best design, why would anyone use anything else?

    If the Dodge Durango hemi was the best why would anyone build anything else? You can extrapolate that out to anything your little heart desires you know the answer.
  • msg
    msg Posts: 9,856
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    I like Mogami stuff, too.
    I disabled signatures.
  • Geoff4rfc
    Geoff4rfc Posts: 2,184
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    I like the coax design however in an effort to customize my own cables, i like to use coat hanger wire and when necessary, will splice them together with plumbers' tape, you know, as a dielectric
    Source: BRP Panasonic UB9000, CDP Emotiva ERC3 - Display: LG OLED EVO 83 C3 - Pre/Pro: Marantz 8802A - Amplification: Emotiva XPA-DR3, XPA-2 x 2, XPA-6, Speakers, Mains/2ch-Focal Kanta No2's, C-LSiM706, S-702F/X, RS-RTiA9's, WS-RTiA9's, FH-RTiA3's, Subs - Epik Empire x 2

    Cables: AudioQuest McKenzie XLR's/CDP/Amp, Carbon 48/BRP, Forest 48/Display, 2 channel speaker cable: Furutech FS Alpha 36 12AWG PCOCC Single Crystal (Douglas Connection)

    EXPERIENCE: next to nothing, but I sure enjoy audio and video MY OPINION OF THIS HOBBY: I may not be a smart man, but I know what quicksand is.
    When I was young, I was Superman but now that old age has gotten the best of me I'm only Batman
  • jbreezy5
    jbreezy5 Posts: 1,141
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    mantis wrote: »
    https://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/audio/index.htm
    Read over this and see what you think. Again not promoting the brand or any brand, just thinking about this design compared to basically most other companies. Again IF coax design is the best design, why would anyone use anything else?

    These are good affordable cables; own some. I like others better, because these are not the most flexible.

    See photo below compared to the PXT1000’s:

    8ycegxnp96m4.jpeg

    The BJC just doesn’t want to hold the bend more than can be seen in the photo.

    The KK DV30 is also a very (maybe more-so than BJC) inflexible cable.
    CD Players: Sony CDP-211; Sony DVP-S9000ES; Sony UDP-X800M2 (x2); Cambridge Audio CXC

    DACs: Jolida Glass FX Tube DAC III (x2); Denafrips Ares II (x2)

    Streamers: ROKU (x3); Bluesound Node 2i and Node N130 w/LHY LPS // Receivers: Yamaha RX-V775BT; Yamaha RX-V777

    Preamps: B&K Ref 50; B&K Ref 5 S2; Classe CP-800 MkII; Audio Research SP16L (soon)

    Amps: Niles SI-275; B&K ST125.7; B&K ST125.2; Classe CA-2300; Butler Audio TDB-5150

    Speakers: Boston Acoustics CR55; Focal Chorus 705v; Wharfedale Diamond 10.2; Monitor Audio Silver-1; Def Tech Mythos One (x4)/Mythos Three Center (x2)/Mythos Two pr.; Martin Logan Electromotion ESL; Legacy Audio Victoria/Silverscreen Center; Gallo Acoustics Reference 3.1; SVS SB-1000 Pro; REL HT-1003; B&W ASW610; HifiMan HE400i

    Turntable: Dual 721 Direct-Drive w/Audio Technica AT-VM95e cart

    Cables: Tripp-lite 14ga. PCs, Blue Jeans Cable ICs, Philips PXT1000 ICs; Kimber Kable DV30 coaxial ICs; Canare L-4E6S XLR ICs; Kimber Kable 8PR & 8TC speaker cables.
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,348
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    Geoff4rfc wrote: »
    I like the coax design however in an effort to customize my own cables, i like to use coat hanger wire and when necessary, will splice them together with plumbers' tape, you know, as a dielectric
    [emphasis added]

    Hey, that stuff is Teflon. Great dielectric.
    B)
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
    edited January 2023
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    I'm gonna put together a 2 channel rig in my basement, use my Paradigm Studio 100's as the speakers, probably some Audioquest Rocket 33 speakers wire, I have a nice Parasound amp and I'll deicide if I'm gonna use a Sonos as a preamp or break out a B&K, Rotel or NAD preamp to drive the paramount. Hell I also have my RT16's in the basement I can use to try out this test. I think the Paradigms would be a better test speaker as they are more neutral than the polk's are.
    With that in mind, I'm gonna do the whole RCA chain meaning source to Pre and Pre to amp and for the hell of it, try a Sonos as a pre and connect directly to the amp. This way I'll be able to hear any differences between my twisted pair or pairs RCA Cables to all of my Coax design cables including some prebuilt ones from Monster , Audioquest , Liberty , Tributaries etc.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • Clipdat
    Clipdat Posts: 12,775
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    Sounds like a fun project. I also suggest using some good old fashioned disc spinners as your source, in lieu of or in addition to, the Sonos streamer.

    It may be easier to hear differences between ICs when using a higher quality source.
  • heiney9
    heiney9 Posts: 25,109
    edited January 2023
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    Digital Audio Cables
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable

    Digital audio cables (or, as they're often called, SPDIF cables) provide a handy way to route multi-channel audio from one device to another with minimal to no signal loss. The specs for a coaxial digital audio cable are the same as for a typical video cable: 75 ohm impedance, coaxial construction. A good impedance match, and wide bandwidth, help keep the digital square-wave signal from rounding off to a point where data loss occurs, so impedance consistency and wide bandwidth are important here, just as in video cabling. The other option, optical or "TOSlink" digital audio cable, carries the same signal in plastic optical fiber; it's less robust over distance, but is generally reliable up to about 50 feet in good fiber.
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable: Belden 1694A

    Our favorite cable for coaxial digital audio use (many others are available; see below) is Belden 1694A "Brilliance" precision digital video coaxial cable, a 75 ohm coax engineered for low signal loss over long runs. These cables are exceptionally well shielded to keep outside electromagnetic interference from entering and polluting the signal; the shielding consists of a combination of a dense (95% coverage) tinned copper braid and a double-sided aluminum-on-polyester foil, for the best protection both against EMI and RFI. View the technical specs for Belden 1694A.
    The Connectors: Canare RCAPs
    Canare RCAP RCA Plug

    Connectors are a critical part of any cable, because if the coax isn't well-joined to the connectors, or if the connectors don't make firm electrical contact with the jacks, it doesn't much matter how good the coax is. For mechanical stability and electrical performance, there's no better RCA plug available than the Canare RCAP. These Canare plugs are designed for the best possible impedance match with 75 ohm video coax. These plugs crimp tightly to both the center conductor and the coaxial shield, so that the shielding of the whole cable assembly is tight and uninterrupted. The RCAP's gold-plated "internal pressure contact fingers" provide a strong, tight, electrically sound connection with equipment jacks, without the excessive tightness of many competing designs. View Canare's description and specs for the RCAP plugs.   Need BNC plugs or F-connectors instead? See below.

    f0vndqr18n0t.png

    wf0atiufvfil.png


    This is the digital cable I've used for years between my source and dac. 75 ohm coax.

    H9
    "Appreciation of audio is a completely subjective human experience. Measurements can provide a measure of insight, but are no substitute for human judgment. Why are we looking to reduce a subjective experience to objective criteria anyway? The subtleties of music and audio reproduction are for those who appreciate it. Differentiation by numbers is for those who do not".--Nelson Pass Pass Labs XA25 | EE Avant Pre | EE Mini Max Supreme DAC | MIT Shotgun S1 | Pangea AC14SE MKII | Legend L600 | BlueSound Node 3 - Tubes add soul!
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 24,924
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    heiney9 wrote: »
    Digital Audio Cables
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable

    Digital audio cables (or, as they're often called, SPDIF cables) provide a handy way to route multi-channel audio from one device to another with minimal to no signal loss. The specs for a coaxial digital audio cable are the same as for a typical video cable: 75 ohm impedance, coaxial construction. A good impedance match, and wide bandwidth, help keep the digital square-wave signal from rounding off to a point where data loss occurs, so impedance consistency and wide bandwidth are important here, just as in video cabling. The other option, optical or "TOSlink" digital audio cable, carries the same signal in plastic optical fiber; it's less robust over distance, but is generally reliable up to about 50 feet in good fiber.
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable: Belden 1694A

    Our favorite cable for coaxial digital audio use (many others are available; see below) is Belden 1694A "Brilliance" precision digital video coaxial cable, a 75 ohm coax engineered for low signal loss over long runs. These cables are exceptionally well shielded to keep outside electromagnetic interference from entering and polluting the signal; the shielding consists of a combination of a dense (95% coverage) tinned copper braid and a double-sided aluminum-on-polyester foil, for the best protection both against EMI and RFI. View the technical specs for Belden 1694A.
    The Connectors: Canare RCAPs
    Canare RCAP RCA Plug

    Connectors are a critical part of any cable, because if the coax isn't well-joined to the connectors, or if the connectors don't make firm electrical contact with the jacks, it doesn't much matter how good the coax is. For mechanical stability and electrical performance, there's no better RCA plug available than the Canare RCAP. These Canare plugs are designed for the best possible impedance match with 75 ohm video coax. These plugs crimp tightly to both the center conductor and the coaxial shield, so that the shielding of the whole cable assembly is tight and uninterrupted. The RCAP's gold-plated "internal pressure contact fingers" provide a strong, tight, electrically sound connection with equipment jacks, without the excessive tightness of many competing designs. View Canare's description and specs for the RCAP plugs.   Need BNC plugs or F-connectors instead? See below.

    f0vndqr18n0t.png

    wf0atiufvfil.png


    This is the digital cable I've used for years between my source and dac. 75 ohm coax.

    H9

    I've personally made many of those cables with the same ends. Those Canare ends feature a gold plated pure copper end that slides over the conductor that you crimp on the conductor with a special crimper. Then that end slides into the RCA body pin part and then locks into place. Once locked into the body you cannot remove it without destroying the RCA. You then crimp the whole RCA body onto the cable shield and outer jacket itself. It's a very robust connection to the cable. The crimping tool is $100 itself, it's a very nice crimping tool and worth the money.

    The Belden 1694a and Canare cables are very good cables, shielding is very good on both.
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    Clipdat wrote: »
    Sounds like a fun project. I also suggest using some good old fashioned disc spinners as your source, in lieu of or in addition to, the Sonos streamer.

    It may be easier to hear differences between ICs when using a higher quality source.
    Most likely use both. I don't think I got much I have to do today so today is probably gonna be the project.

    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
    Options
    heiney9 wrote: »
    Digital Audio Cables
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable

    Digital audio cables (or, as they're often called, SPDIF cables) provide a handy way to route multi-channel audio from one device to another with minimal to no signal loss. The specs for a coaxial digital audio cable are the same as for a typical video cable: 75 ohm impedance, coaxial construction. A good impedance match, and wide bandwidth, help keep the digital square-wave signal from rounding off to a point where data loss occurs, so impedance consistency and wide bandwidth are important here, just as in video cabling. The other option, optical or "TOSlink" digital audio cable, carries the same signal in plastic optical fiber; it's less robust over distance, but is generally reliable up to about 50 feet in good fiber.
    Coaxial Digital Audio Cable: Belden 1694A

    Our favorite cable for coaxial digital audio use (many others are available; see below) is Belden 1694A "Brilliance" precision digital video coaxial cable, a 75 ohm coax engineered for low signal loss over long runs. These cables are exceptionally well shielded to keep outside electromagnetic interference from entering and polluting the signal; the shielding consists of a combination of a dense (95% coverage) tinned copper braid and a double-sided aluminum-on-polyester foil, for the best protection both against EMI and RFI. View the technical specs for Belden 1694A.
    The Connectors: Canare RCAPs
    Canare RCAP RCA Plug

    Connectors are a critical part of any cable, because if the coax isn't well-joined to the connectors, or if the connectors don't make firm electrical contact with the jacks, it doesn't much matter how good the coax is. For mechanical stability and electrical performance, there's no better RCA plug available than the Canare RCAP. These Canare plugs are designed for the best possible impedance match with 75 ohm video coax. These plugs crimp tightly to both the center conductor and the coaxial shield, so that the shielding of the whole cable assembly is tight and uninterrupted. The RCAP's gold-plated "internal pressure contact fingers" provide a strong, tight, electrically sound connection with equipment jacks, without the excessive tightness of many competing designs. View Canare's description and specs for the RCAP plugs.   Need BNC plugs or F-connectors instead? See below.

    f0vndqr18n0t.png

    wf0atiufvfil.png


    This is the digital cable I've used for years between my source and dac. 75 ohm coax.

    H9
    This is what I think supports the idea of using this style of cable to transfer analog cables. The shielding alone should at very least keep things out which is what can greatly effect the signal transfer process.
    Twisted pair design no mater how good of quality the conductors are, IF they get interference, it's going to effect the signal transfer. IF there is no interference, I can't see why twisted pair design is bad.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • heiney9
    heiney9 Posts: 25,109
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    Really not an expensive experiment. The above are $24/3 ft terminated. Double the order and you have a pair for about $50.

    I use MIT Shotgun analog cables so I wouldn't be the one to experiment. But it would be an interesting read if someone does decide to do a comparison to twisted pair analog I/C's. It's a valid question.

    I have always been extremely happy with the MIT's so my days of chasing analog I/C's is long passed.

    H9
    "Appreciation of audio is a completely subjective human experience. Measurements can provide a measure of insight, but are no substitute for human judgment. Why are we looking to reduce a subjective experience to objective criteria anyway? The subtleties of music and audio reproduction are for those who appreciate it. Differentiation by numbers is for those who do not".--Nelson Pass Pass Labs XA25 | EE Avant Pre | EE Mini Max Supreme DAC | MIT Shotgun S1 | Pangea AC14SE MKII | Legend L600 | BlueSound Node 3 - Tubes add soul!
  • audioluvr
    audioluvr Posts: 5,492
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    Geoff4rfc wrote: »
    I like the coax design however in an effort to customize my own cables, i like to use coat hanger wire and when necessary, will splice them together with plumbers' tape, you know, as a dielectric

    I don't like plumbers tape. It has a funny smell.
    Gustard X26 Pro DAC
    Belles 21A Pre modded with Mundorf Supreme caps
    B&K M200 Sonata monoblocks refreshed and upgraded
    Polk SDA 1C's modded / 1000Va Dreadnaught
    Wireworld Silver Eclipse IC's and speaker cables
    Harman Kardon T65C w/Grado Gold. (Don't laugh. It sounds great!)


    There is about a 5% genetic difference between apes and men …but that difference is the difference between throwing your own poo when you are annoyed …and Einstein, Shakespeare and Miss January. by Dr. Sardonicus
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 33,348
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    audioluvr wrote: »
    Geoff4rfc wrote: »
    I like the coax design however in an effort to customize my own cables, i like to use coat hanger wire and when necessary, will splice them together with plumbers' tape, you know, as a dielectric

    I don't like plumbers tape. It has a funny smell.

    Only after it comes into contact with a plumber. Or plumbing. :#

    JK, of course, because everyone knows that plumbers smell like rainbows and unicorns on a fresh spring morning -- at least when they go to work.
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 17,126
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    heiney9 wrote: »
    Really not an expensive experiment. The above are $24/3 ft terminated. Double the order and you have a pair for about $50.

    I use MIT Shotgun analog cables so I wouldn't be the one to experiment. But it would be an interesting read if someone does decide to do a comparison to twisted pair analog I/C's. It's a valid question.

    I have always been extremely happy with the MIT's so my days of chasing analog I/C's is long passed.

    H9
    Honestly, I'm not chasing anything either. My days of chasing any wire is also long gone BUT I was told that the coax design is the perfect design to transfer analog signals due to it's ability to shield itself from interference. Interference is one of the things that can ruin your signal transfer. I was also told that the resistance , using 50 ohm load vs 75 ohm load doesn't make any difference and isn't an important measure.

    The best subwoofer cables is a cox design due to traveling longer distances usually. So it makes sense. I should have some findings today.

    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.