The Space Thread -

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  • Tony M
    Tony M Posts: 10,840
    A 9-hour day... :p
    Some people would love the 3 hr. work period 3 days a week. :D

    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • NotaSuv
    NotaSuv Posts: 3,655
    THE moon launch is a GO for Monday...already thousands in the area as there is a night SpaceX launch this weekend, and night launches always draw a crowd..amazed at the number of visitors from out of Country.
  • jdjohn
    jdjohn Posts: 2,609
    edited August 2022
    Yep, Jupiter is one of the 'Gas Giants', with a relatively small rock core...but nonetheless still larger than Earth. Most of Jupiter is metallic liquid hydrogen. I'm not sure I can even process what that is like. I guess it's something similar to liquid Mercury.

    Here's an image:
    y6k6z0z3txv4.jpg

    Post edited by jdjohn on
    "This may not matter to you, but it does to me for various reasons, many of them illogical or irrational, but the vinyl hobby is not really logical or rational..." - member on Vinyl Engine
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    Regarding collectibles: "It's not who gets it. It's who gets stuck with it." - Jimmy Fallon
  • mrbigbluelight
    mrbigbluelight Posts: 8,935
    edited August 2022
    What is mind boggling is the size of the giant red spot/hurricane.

    Could swallow the earth.

    The amount of energy that's required to sustain such a bodaciously huge storm is...
    ...😳😳😳😳😳😳😳😳

    i457mqdpv0mi.jpg

    Sal Palooza
  • verb
    verb Posts: 10,177
    treitz3 wrote: »
    So, I got curious and looked it up.

    "The "canonical" (that is, commonly accepted) day length on Jupiter is determined by the rotation rate of its magnetic field, which is nine hours, 55 minutes long."

    They say you learn something everyday. Well, I may have been told this before but today, I learned (or was reminded again) that Jupiter is the fastest rotating planet in our solar system and that it's measured by its magnetic field (that part, I did not know).

    More useless, trivial p o o p that I will carry around with me....like I need more.

    Tom

    Bing bing bing, Tom gets the prize! Some more info on previous attempts to calculate a Jovian day, and other factoids!

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  • verb
    verb Posts: 10,177
    NotaSuv wrote: »
    THE moon launch is a GO for Monday...already thousands in the area as there is a night SpaceX launch this weekend, and night launches always draw a crowd..amazed at the number of visitors from out of Country.

    I'll be watching via livestream! Perhaps even a vacation day! History in the making!
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  • verb
    verb Posts: 10,177
    Cool pic of a recent SLS flyby.

    k4v7e1f6qa7f.png
    Basement: Polk SDA SRS 1.2tl's, Cary SLP-05 Pre with ultimate upgrade,McIntosh MCD301 CD/SACD player, Northstar Designs Excelsio DAC, Cambridge 851N streamer, McIntosh MC300 Amp, Silnote Morpheus Ref2, Series2 Digital Cables, Silnote Morpheus Ref2 Series2 XLR's, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Pangea Power Cables, MIT Shotgun S3 IC's, MIT Shotgun S1 Bi-Wire speaker cables
    Office: PC, EAR Acute CD Player, EAR 834L Pre, Northstar Designs Intenso DAC, Antique Sound Labs AV8 Monoblocks, Denon UDR-F10 Cassette, Acoustic Technologies Classic FR Speakers, SVS SB12 Plus sub, MIT AVt2 speaker cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable, Groneberg Quatro Reference IC's
    Spare Room: Dayens Ampino Integrated Amp, Tjoeb 99 tube CD player (modified Marantz CD-38), Analysis Plus Oval 9's, Zu Jumpers, AudioEngine B1 Streamer, Klipsch RB-61 v2, SVS PB1000 sub, Blue Jeans RCA IC's, Shunyata Hydra 8 Power Conditioner
    Living Room: Peachtree Nova Integrated, Cambridge CXN v2 Streamer, Rotel RCD-1072 CD player, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Polk RT265 In Wall Speakers, Polk DSW Pro 660wi sub
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  • NotaSuv
    NotaSuv Posts: 3,655
    Bonus launch for those in town...10:20pm will see the launch of yet another SpaceX rocket full of satellites to pollute the space around us..it is a night time launch and they are very cool to watch..
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 16,314
    Back to Jupiter for a second. I woke up this morning and got to wondering about this planet again. We already know that Jupiter's day is only a little over nine hours long. Looking at the photo below, I got curious as to the surface speed (if there was a surface) of Jupiter.

    d2r09bvekd36.png

    Earth rotates once in 24 hours; Jupiter once in about 9.3 hours. The surface of Earth at the equator is rotating at about 1000 miles per hour, while Jupiter's equatorial cloud-tops are moving nearly 28,000 miles per hour.

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 22,067
    That make a class 5 hurricane look like a slow breeze
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 16,314
    Another facinating factoid....Earth is spinning around our galaxy at a whopping speed of 490,000 miles per hour, as the Earth spins on axis at 1Kmph while spinning around our sun at 67,000mph.

    Meanwhile, the current wind speed is only 10-15mph where I am right now.

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • mhardy6647
    mhardy6647 Posts: 30,842
    treitz3 wrote: »
    Another facinating factoid....Earth is spinning around our galaxy at a whopping speed of 490,000 miles per hour, as the Earth spins on axis at 1Kmph while spinning around our sun at 67,000mph...
    Lots of energy involved in that spinnin' and whizzin' around.
    To put this in a bit of perspective. Think of balls bouncin' and spinnin' around on a pool table after a break. That's pretty much what we're lookin' at, with the break, presumably, having been the Big Bang.

    Quite a break.

    B)

    ...
  • Speaking of the earth moving through space: like a corkscrew baby !

    Sal Palooza
  • verb
    verb Posts: 10,177
    Basement: Polk SDA SRS 1.2tl's, Cary SLP-05 Pre with ultimate upgrade,McIntosh MCD301 CD/SACD player, Northstar Designs Excelsio DAC, Cambridge 851N streamer, McIntosh MC300 Amp, Silnote Morpheus Ref2, Series2 Digital Cables, Silnote Morpheus Ref2 Series2 XLR's, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Pangea Power Cables, MIT Shotgun S3 IC's, MIT Shotgun S1 Bi-Wire speaker cables
    Office: PC, EAR Acute CD Player, EAR 834L Pre, Northstar Designs Intenso DAC, Antique Sound Labs AV8 Monoblocks, Denon UDR-F10 Cassette, Acoustic Technologies Classic FR Speakers, SVS SB12 Plus sub, MIT AVt2 speaker cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable, Groneberg Quatro Reference IC's
    Spare Room: Dayens Ampino Integrated Amp, Tjoeb 99 tube CD player (modified Marantz CD-38), Analysis Plus Oval 9's, Zu Jumpers, AudioEngine B1 Streamer, Klipsch RB-61 v2, SVS PB1000 sub, Blue Jeans RCA IC's, Shunyata Hydra 8 Power Conditioner
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  • verb
    verb Posts: 10,177
    Basement: Polk SDA SRS 1.2tl's, Cary SLP-05 Pre with ultimate upgrade,McIntosh MCD301 CD/SACD player, Northstar Designs Excelsio DAC, Cambridge 851N streamer, McIntosh MC300 Amp, Silnote Morpheus Ref2, Series2 Digital Cables, Silnote Morpheus Ref2 Series2 XLR's, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Pangea Power Cables, MIT Shotgun S3 IC's, MIT Shotgun S1 Bi-Wire speaker cables
    Office: PC, EAR Acute CD Player, EAR 834L Pre, Northstar Designs Intenso DAC, Antique Sound Labs AV8 Monoblocks, Denon UDR-F10 Cassette, Acoustic Technologies Classic FR Speakers, SVS SB12 Plus sub, MIT AVt2 speaker cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable, Groneberg Quatro Reference IC's
    Spare Room: Dayens Ampino Integrated Amp, Tjoeb 99 tube CD player (modified Marantz CD-38), Analysis Plus Oval 9's, Zu Jumpers, AudioEngine B1 Streamer, Klipsch RB-61 v2, SVS PB1000 sub, Blue Jeans RCA IC's, Shunyata Hydra 8 Power Conditioner
    Living Room: Peachtree Nova Integrated, Cambridge CXN v2 Streamer, Rotel RCD-1072 CD player, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, Polk RT265 In Wall Speakers, Polk DSW Pro 660wi sub
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  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 16,314
    edited September 2022
    1bix2zcrrruz.png

    𝐈𝐬 𝐏𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐭? 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧𝐞, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞.

    Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. Subject to memorization in school and known as the definitive planetary lineup, Pluto was included in the list until the International Astronomical Union determined it did not meet qualifications in 2006.

    Though Pluto is no longer considered a major planet, it's still beloved by the science community and regularly makes headlines. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration recently posted a technicolor photo of Pluto, created by scientists to show subtle differences between its regions.

    Here's why Pluto isn't officially considered a planet anymore.

    Why is Pluto not a planet?

    Pluto came into the lexicon in 1930 when astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered it when searching for signs of a planet. It wasn't until the early 2000s that researchers began developing the qualifications for a celestial body to be considered a planet.

    In 2006, the IAU voted that the definition of a planet relied on three specifications:
    It orbits around the sun
    It has sufficient mass so that it becomes a nearly round shape
    It has cleared the neighborhood around its orbit

    IAU members also concurred that dwarf planets and planets are two distinct classifications. They determined the solar system contains eight planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

    Pluto does not meet the third criteria because it is not gravitationally dominant, the Library of Congress reports. This means Pluto is classified as a dwarf planet rather than a major planet like its formerly assumed siblings.

    What are dwarf planets?

    Dwarf planets are smaller planets that do not meet all three categories of a planet. According to NASA, they are round in shape and orbit the sun, but don't clear their orbital path. There are currently five recognized dwarf planets in our solar system, listed here in order of closest proximity to the Earth:

    Ceres: Located in the Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter, discovered in 1801
    Pluto: Located in the Kuiper Belt, discovered in 1930
    Eris: Located in the Kuiper Belt, discovered in 2003
    Makemake: Located in the Kuiper Belt, discovered in 2005
    Haumea: Located in the Kuiper Belt, discovered in 2003

    Controversial categories

    While the IAU definition of planets remains the globally adopted one, that doesn't mean it's unanimously accepted. Some planetary experts dispute the 2006 vote, saying the definitions are arbitrary. In 2018, scientist Philip Metzger from the University of Central Florida published a study that suggested the standard for classifying planets is not scientifically sound.

    Metzger argues that planetary scientists use the word "planet" in a number of ways because it's a functionally useful term, and that a planet should be defined by its intrinsic properties rather than its orbit, which can change over time.

    "It's more dynamic and alive than Mars," Metzger said in a UCF press release, referring to its underground ocean, multiple moons, organic compounds and multilayer atmosphere. "The only planet that has more complex geology is the Earth."

    NASA's Alan Stern also disagrees with the IAU. In an interview with Forbes, he said all dwarf planets should be considered planets for a number of reasons—one being that the solar system contains so many asteroids that no celestial body has cleared the neighborhood of its orbit.

    https://phys.org/news/2022-08-pluto-planet-longer.html

    Tom

    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • scubalab
    scubalab Posts: 3,074
    ^^^
    But...


    It identifies as a planet.


    Case closed. It's 2022.
  • NotaSuv
    NotaSuv Posts: 3,655
    People already staking out places to see the launch try #2 and we are over 2 days away...expecting a larger crowd than the first attempt due to the fact it's Labor Day weekend.....A real shot in the arm financially for a town of 48,000....took almost 4 hours to clear the cars out of town....we have a great view from the house..
  • nooshinjohn
    nooshinjohn Posts: 24,030
    edited September 2022
    I will just drop this right here... I remember these launching way back in the day. It amazes me they are still out there doing their jobs pretty much as designed, but we can't get a toaster to work for six months before it's junk.
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/nasa-fixes-weird-glitch-on-the-farthest-space-probe-in-the-cosmos/ar-AA11qaot?ocid=msedgdhp&pc=U531&cvid=f9881b56b2074d6787f9044c69c46429
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    In retirement...TriangleArt Reference SE with Walker Precision Motor Drive,

    “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book has been rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered…History has stopped. Nothing exists except the endless present in which the party is always right” — George Orwell

    “If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 16,314
    Is Neptune in danger of its current classification as well?

    "Technically" Pluto’s orbit does cross Neptune’s orbital path along with other objects in our solar system which the IAU classified Pluto as dwarf planet due to not clearing other object from its orbit . But one could argue that Neptune also hasn’t cleared its orbit around Pluto and Kuiper Belt Objects too since its orbit is crossed with theirs which means Neptune is technically a dwarf planet.

    According to the IAU, clearing the neighborhood from other objects means a body that’s gravitational dominant to the point that it has strong influence over other objects in its orbital path.

    I report. You decide.

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • treitz3
    treitz3 Posts: 16,314
    dof4fcde10fi.png

    How about this for a little bit of perspective? S5 0014+81, the largest known supermassive black hole compared to our entire solar system.

    Tom
    ~ In search of accurate reproduction of music. Real sound is my reference and while perfection may not be attainable? If I chase it, I might just catch excellence. ~
  • pitdogg2
    pitdogg2 Posts: 22,067
    No way! That thing would swallow up all of the outer space.....
  • Tony M
    Tony M Posts: 10,840
    The darkness comeith...

    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.