New pressings of Vinyl vs used

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  • ClipdatClipdat Posts: 4,965
    edited September 24
    mlistens03 wrote: »
    Even in all the tiny differences? I can only vaguely hear the difference between two sets of speakers if it is an hour or two apart, whereas right next to each other, it's night and day. They have to be REALLY different for me not to hear only a slight difference the next day, going off of memory from yesterday. The exception is inferior sound. better or worse is noticeable. Different, not so much.

    Your first audio show can't come soon enough! ;)

    Go all three days!
  • mlistens03mlistens03 Posts: 2,330
    Clipdat wrote: »
    mlistens03 wrote: »
    Even in all the tiny differences? I can only vaguely hear the difference between two sets of speakers if it is an hour or two apart, whereas right next to each other, it's night and day. They have to be REALLY different for me not to hear only a slight difference the next day, going off of memory from yesterday. The exception is inferior sound. better or worse is noticeable. Different, not so much.

    Your first audio show can't come soon enough! ;)

    Go all three days!

    I wish it was tomorrow... Oh well, I can wait... not for any longer than I have to though. :)
    That’s the plan!
    Micah

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    I've always thought the goal of high-end audio was not to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Turn that darn music down' but to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Tell your friends to go home and you can practice later this week'.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 40,631
    joecoulson wrote: »
    Your sense memory must be better than mine
    Too much time between sampling and I forget the sounds
    Side by side and it’s plainly obvious to me

    I can't say for sure what it is, perhaps some folks are naturally better at being able to hear differences at greater time intervals or perhaps it's from years of listening and knowing what to listen for.

    For me the fast A/B switching is the worst way to hear differences. Sure, sometimes the differences are bloody obvious, but a lot of the time it's more subtle and the fast switching confuses the brain.
    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


  • muncybobmuncybob Posts: 1,913
    I think it's very true that different people hear differences better one way or another. I also think that the mood you are in can affect what you perceive to be happening.

    Audio is sort of like drugs, they affect various people in various ways.
    Yep, my name really is Bob.
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  • DarqueKnightDarqueKnight Posts: 6,342
    joecoulson wrote: »
    A/B testing is really only good when direct examples in a very short period of time can be made. Otherwise perception become more involved.
    joecoulson wrote: »
    Your sense memory must be better than mine
    Too much time between sampling and I forget the sounds
    Side by side and it’s plainly obvious to me
    mlistens03 wrote: »
    F1nut wrote: »
    A/B testing is really only good when direct examples in a very short period of time can be made.

    False.

    Care to explain why?
    Joe, that is also what I've experienced.

    Think of what the end result of a stereophonic recording is supposed to do: create a three dimensional sound stage consisting of multiple vocal and/or instrumental sound images spread out side to side, front to back, and bottom to top.

    Simply put, there is simply too much going on in a stereo recording to note all the differences between two trials in a brief listening session. It is easy for differences to be masked by some other sound, particularly if it is a sound you like a lot. Sometimes the difference is not in what is heard, but what is felt with regard to tactile sensation against the body.

    I don't/can't depend on memory alone, unless the differences are glaring. In fact, I don't even listen for differences, I listen to document (with written notes) everything I hear. Sometimes the differences between trials are easily heard. Often I do not become aware of differences until I compare listening notes.
    "So hot it burns Mice!"~DK
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  • joecoulsonjoecoulson Posts: 955
    Great idea about listening notes
    Never thought to do that.
  • joecoulsonjoecoulson Posts: 955
    I will add this though, I recently picked up the Cambridge Audio CXN and before I purchased, I needed to see if the sound quality was enough of a jump over the Bluesound Node 2 to justify the price. The dealer had both for me to listen to. We put the same songs on one after another switching back and forth. The choice was obvious to me and also the other listener. I’m not sure I could have made such a clear choice had I been forced to listen two each device separately and even in other environments. For this instance, immediate A/B listening worked for me.
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