patching sub output to L/R

I have resisted purchasing a subwoofer because my main speakers are the large RTA15-tl towers which really have a nice tight low end and I have an A150 Acurus high current amp. Through discussions with a wise salesman I realized that I could split the sub output and patch it into the L/R which I have done between the preamp and amp. I have heard lots of new low information especially from DVD-Audio sources. Just wondering if anyone out there has done this also and if there is any downside to it. Thanks.
Post edited by gene stangel on

Comments

  • sgtgto
    sgtgto Posts: 310
    edited July 2002
    Hi:

    A sub is purchased because they go lower than a normal woofer in the average speaker. Most passive speakers will not go down into the 20 to 30Hz that a sub will, even if you do patch the sub output to your L and R channel. Also you might damage your RTAs if you really push them at below their low end.

    You will need a sub if you want to hear the lfe that is intended for you to hear on DVDs.


    Gary
  • mantis
    mantis Posts: 16,412
    edited July 2002
    Agreed.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • nascarmann
    nascarmann Posts: 1,464
    edited July 2002
    If he has the LFE going to the main l/r, IMO there wouldn't be any advantage to this setup? The signal should already be there from the processor to the l/r front? :confused:
    Oh, the bottle has been to me, my closes friend, my worse enemy!
  • sgtgto
    sgtgto Posts: 310
    edited July 2002
    HI:

    I really don't see any point either, but it may depend on how his receiver is set up. Anyway, get a sub.

    GAry
  • shack
    shack Posts: 11,155
    edited July 2002
    I tried several different setups for my sub. LFE single input, line level from speaker inputs and then out to the mains, running a single cable from each of the L and R pre-outs of my reciever to the L and R input of the sub. I finally ended up with a "Y" adapter from my LFE and sending it to the subs L and R input. I got the idea from Adire Audio. I was considering the Rava subwoofer and had downloaded the manual. I ended up with a Dayton Titanic sealed sub (very similar to the Rava). Here is the excerpt from the manual:

    "NOTE: If your LFE output is a single channel then you only need one cable from the LFE output to the Rava. You can use either low level input: left is used by convention. Additionally, if you need additional gain on the LFE channel, a simple "Y" jack to run the LFE input to both the left and right channels will give you a "free" 6dB of gain.

    Rava Owner's Guide"

    This setup worked very well for me.
    "Just because you’re offended doesn’t mean you’re right." - Ricky Gervais

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  • scottvamp
    scottvamp Posts: 3,277
    edited July 2002
    simple "Y" jack to run the LFE input to both the left and right channels will give you a "free" 6dB of gain.
    Good post shack - I have always used and supported the y adapter method. It just makes sence. I have not found a better way to hook up lfe to a sub yet.
    :cool:
  • sgtgto
    sgtgto Posts: 310
    edited July 2002
    Hi:

    Most subs I have seen have a dual voice coil that takes a Y adapter. Check out your sub cables and I believe you will find a Y adapter included with it. I know Monster's does, I have one. I have said it before, there is no R and L to a single sub. Just a dual voice coil.

    The LFE out of your receiver is just that. It is to connect your sub. I believe you will get the best results that way.

    GAry
  • OrangeToupee
    OrangeToupee Posts: 488
    edited July 2002
    Run RCA's to both of your sub's input's, even if your sub doesn't have a dual voice coil; it's only like six bucks down at the radio shack ... and you should also wear a dress when you do this.