DTS and Digital Optical Cables (what does one need exactly?)

nuinnnuinn Posts: 15
Hi there everyone,
I just purchased my first receiver in over 8 years,
an Onkyo TX-SR600 (6.1 capable). I own a Sony DVD player, (capeable of componet video), As well as a Componet Capable TV (Toshiba Color Stream), and need to know if i need only a TOSlink Cable (digital optical cable) for DTS playback or a TOS link AND a (digital optical) Coxial cable. i think i only need one or the other, and i think it should be a high end TOSlink cable (AR brand). Any suggestions and information for this would be very appreciated.

Also, do need any other Audio Cable coming from my DVD player to my receiver? or does the TOS link cable carry all stream types?
(i do not have the 5.1 block in use, from the DVD to Receiver, i have the R-L in use) If the TOSlink (ifoptical is all i need, I think it might be good to detatch what is never used)

Thanks for suggestions.
Post edited by nuinn on

Comments

  • AaronAaron Posts: 1,853
    edited May 2002
    All you need is one digital cable to carry all of the audio signal (2 channel to 6.1 channel). I would recommend the coax (RCA-style) cable over the optical. It's generally recognized as the better way to go.

    Aaron
  • nuinnnuinn Posts: 15
    edited May 2002
    Dear Arron,
    thanks for your Super Swift Reply!!!, i'm headed out now to pick it up now!
  • aaburto99aaburto99 Posts: 17
    edited May 2002
    Make sure your DVD player is set to output in "bitstream" instead of "PCM" or else you won't be able to use DTS.
  • Norm E. DickeyNorm E. Dickey Posts: 36
    edited May 2002
    One or the other (TOSlink or coaxial) is sufficient. I myself prefer a quality coaxial digital cable, to me the TOSlink tends to make the treble a bit harsh. You may have to 'tell' the DVD player or receiver which cable format you're using.

    Do you need a 6.1/7.1 capable DVD player to go with the 6.1/7.1 capable receiver? I run homemade 6.1 and I may look into upgrading my main pre/pro instead of having two pre-amps on my rack (Sunfire Theater Grand and Carver CT-26v). Thanks.
    Welcome to my home, enter of your own free will and leave a bit of the happiness that you bring. -D
  • nuinnnuinn Posts: 15
    edited May 2002
    Dear aaburto99,
    thanks, than well could have driven me crazy (admitedly a short trip)

    Dear Norm E. Dickey
    I'm thinking a sound data stream is going come through, as it is, across digital out cable, it's the decoding receiver that cares What it is.
    does that make sence ( as speculation?)

    Thanks for the thoughts and help,

    i really appreciate it!

    Doug
  • dbournivaldbournival Posts: 131
    edited May 2002
    You can use toslink or coaxial, there are those that prefer one over the other. I really don't have a preference, I've used both and cannot say one sounds better than the other. Based on the new equipment coming out it appears that toslink is the way most equipment is going. I think the Onkyo 600 has 3 toslinks and 1 coaxial, it's predecessor (onkyo 595) has 2 toslinks and 2 coaxials
  • mantismantis Posts: 15,166
    edited May 2002
    you will be fine with one or the other.They both do the same exact job,sound exactley the same, the only benifit of using coax over toshlink is durability.The toslink can breake if bent the wrong way, just be carefull with the toslink, sit back and enjoy.
    Nice to think back on those days of the wire war.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • RuSsMaNRuSsMaN Posts: 17,995
    edited May 2002
    Rotel Corporation's take on the subject:

    /start Rotel quote/
    The debate rages on. Toslink fans claim thier cable is more accurate because it relies on light transmition which has less resistance.

    Coax supporters argue their cable is better protected with its thicker jacket and offers a tighter connection.

    Interestingly, high quality RCA video interconnects have been substituted for digital coaxial with similar results since video interconnects fit the same specifications used for digital audio. However, do not use a standard RCA audio cable in place of a digital coaxial cable. In the end, your ears are the final judge over which way to go.
    /end Rotel quote/


    /from Audioholics/
    "Between optical and coax, which connection is going to give the better sound quality, and why?"

    Answer:

    Better is relative. In a harsh environment, optical may have advantages. By "harsh" I mean:

    1) Cable runs over 10ft

    2) Cable runs in close proximity to video and power cords emanating RF noise

    In most cases, the above conditions would result in negligible impacts on the signal quality since the signal being transmitted (PCM or bitstream) is sampled at low frequencies (44-48KHz) and thus are more immune to noise impairments.

    However, using optical cables can minimize the potential of the above mentioned problems and thus may help to reduce common mode noise. The only negative about using optical cables is the connection is not always as secure as a coax one, and can sometimes be compromised easily by moving components frequently. In addition, optical cables are usually more expensive than coax ones.

    Bottom Line: Using optical cables for your digital connections may help minimize susceptibility of coupling RF noise into the line and reduce loss for long runs (10 feet or more). However, optical cables tend to be more costly and sensitive to abrupt external forces, which may potentially weaken the connection over time. In any event, either connection method should yield excellent and comparable results in most cases
    /end Audioholics/

    Cheers,
    Russ
    Check your lips at the door woman. Shake your hips like battleships. Yeah, all the white girls trip when I sing at Sunday service.
  • ted538ted538 Posts: 63
    edited May 2002
    I have my Denon 1600 hooked up with an optical cable...it`s perfect...never tried the coxial hook up before.
  • nuinnnuinn Posts: 15
    edited May 2002
    Thanks Folks,

    in the end, i went with the Coaxial,
    and what the heck do i know.

    It all sounds Darn nice.

    it's Very Complicated Hobby,
    but very rewarding when things start coming together.

    I think i've got it all humming along nicely,

    now it's a question of finding what sounds nice Sound Feild Wise.
    (this Onkyo is Very complicated for me)

    But boy does it sound good!

    Thanks for everything!

    Nuinn
  • PETERNGPETERNG Posts: 918
    edited May 2002
    Originally posted by RuSsMaN
    Rotel Corporation's take on the subject:

    /Bottom Line: Using optical cables for your digital connections may help minimize susceptibility of coupling RF noise into the line and reduce loss for long runs (10 feet or more). However, optical cables tend to be more costly and sensitive to abrupt external forces, which may potentially weaken the connection over time. In any event, either connection method should yield excellent and comparable results in most cases
    /end Audioholics/


    My rule of thumb is: if the distance is less than 6ft, use coax, more than 6ft, use optical, try to buy the quality cable, I used 4 coax and 4 optical cables in my system, my coax cables cost more than the optical cables...
  • mantismantis Posts: 15,166
    edited May 2002
    LISTEN UP GUYS.................
    This is a fun test.Get both optical and coax and test the **** out of both cables.Make sure they are equal length to make it fair and of the same quality.I did this test over 3 years ago.And did it for about a year off and on.I tested the livin hell out of my cables.TEST TEST TEST like a mental patient.
    My end results is...................................................you fill in the blank with your own test.Post back, I would love to read them.

    YOU CAN SIT HERE AND DEBATE WHICH ONE IS BETTER AND WHY, BUT WITHOUT EXPERIENCE WITH THEM,YOU CANT ANSWER HONESTLY.
    GO HAVE SOME FUN WILL YEAH!!!!!
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • jeberhartjeberhart Posts: 69
    edited May 2002
    My Denon 3801 receiver has three optical inputs and one coax input, so I had to decide which component would go into the coax, and I chose my CAL cd player. I just think coaxial sounds warmer on audio sources, but maybe I'm full of it. Anyway, the CAL cd player doesn't have optical, only coax out, so there's no way to do a comparison. My DVD player has both, and I've tried both coax and optical on it...and really couldn't tell much difference. It was a moot point anyway; it had to go into the Denon via optical. The other two optical ins are taken up by a CD changer and a CD recorder. Not really on the subject, but the one thing about the Denon that disappoints me is that I have only four digitals in. I could easily use three more -- one for digital cable box, which I had to elect to use in analog mode since I ran out of inputs, one for an old Philips Laserdisc player that I can't bear to get rid of, and one for my old DAT recorder. All three of those components have coaxial outputs only, so I'm basically screwed. Question: Does anyone make a digital switching box? If so, I'd be interested in it.
    "Evil men have no songs." -- Quotation found in Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Gods"
  • joe logstonjoe logston Posts: 882
    edited May 2002
    i think they both sound the same, but i use toslink, just have to be carefull with it. all it dose is pipe a digital singal 1-0 at high speeds its not like sending an analog muiscal singal
    . rt-7 mains
    rt-20p surounds
    cs-400i front center
    cs-350 ls rear center
    2 energy take 5, efects
    2- psw-650 , subs
    1- 15" audiosource sub

    lets all go to the next ces.
  • TheGrayGhostTheGrayGhost Posts: 196
    edited May 2002
    ”Question: Does anyone make a digital switching box? If so, I'd be interested in it.”

    I’m using this digital switching box with my 3801.

    http://www.digitalconnection.com/Products/Audio/AA1177.htm
    Best Regards, Cliff
  • jeberhartjeberhart Posts: 69
    edited May 2002
    I appreciate the link, Cliff. I've got one on order.
    "Evil men have no songs." -- Quotation found in Nietzsche's "Twilight of the Gods"
  • mantismantis Posts: 15,166
    edited May 2002
    Depending on the quality of your cd player,run it in Analog.Any non dd or dts source ,run in analog if you need more digital inputs.4 should be enough.Sometimes the DAC's are better in the player then the receiver.My DAC's in my cd player sound much better then my Denon's DAC's do.My cd player is a Pioneer Elite PDF-19 301 megachanger.Much clearer and detailed, not to mention I wired it with Transparent Musiclink 1m interconnects.
    Dan
    My personal quest is to save to world of bad audio, one thread at a time.
  • lakeraylakeray Posts: 7
    edited May 2002
    So I gather that the coaxial better than the optical for long runs (maybe). But does that mean both are better than my 6.1 cables from my DVD to my reciever?:confused:


    Thanks

    Lakeray
  • nuinnnuinn Posts: 15
    edited May 2002
    just the other day i was told by the local tweeter manager that
    this is true. (i'm trusting the man who sells a lot of higher end products including ceiling mounter projectors. i didn't ask what was used persay for those, but did ask which was better, his responce: "For short Runs, Coaxial is better".
    I'm thinking that an over head projector would be a "long run".
    any thoughts?

    BTW, my home theatre page is now sharing my Computer rig page; anyone want to see it: it's being transformed rather majorly, very soon, as i take delivery of my new Sony KV 40 XBR 700, mated to a new Sony DVP-S9000S, take a look:

    http://www.his.com/~darnok/comp.html
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