You gotta love this.

Even a cheap Chinese meter knows this is a resistor hahahaah8in4e8iqj9s4.jpg

Comments

  • sansuibutchsansuibutch Posts: 141
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    But -- apparently it didn't know that resistance is futile...

    B)

    Maybe it needs a little camera and some image recognition s/w.
    ... or maybe that cap just has high internal resistance :|

    ocy6i6s0kd8e.png

    Its not a capacitor, its a polyswitch.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 25,824
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    But -- apparently it didn't know that resistance is futile...

    B)

    Maybe it needs a little camera and some image recognition s/w.
    ... or maybe that cap just has high internal resistance :|

    ocy6i6s0kd8e.png

    Its not a capacitor, its a polyswitch.

    Well, then, it was righter than I was -- looks like you got your money's worth! :)

  • sansuibutchsansuibutch Posts: 141
    And another. These are out of a set of crs u11bu4yofxlt.jpg
    These a
  • sansuibutchsansuibutch Posts: 141
    These two I cant remember where they came from but pretty sure the bigger one with lower resistance came from one of my sda srs.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 16,774
    For the record they are actually called Thermistors. They were used in CRT monitors and televisions among other things. They are used for voltage regulation, volume control, time delays, and circuit protection. In CRT's they were used for the degaussing circuit to wipe off the previous image on the screen. The number you see on the side (-050 and -090) are trip points, the larger the number the more they could handle before tripping. Unfortunately they would trip easier the more times they were tripped. My SDA's polyswitches were so wore out that they would trip very very easily. Even with good amplification they would trip at about 20-30 watts. When we replace them with resistors we use a .5 ohm resistor to closely equate the resistance of the Thermistor(polyswitch) circuit so the tweeter is not too hot (loud).

    If I remember correctly the -050 was used in speakers that had a .75amp fast blow fuse for protection. The -090 was used in speakers that had used a 1amp fast blow fuse.
  • sansuibutchsansuibutch Posts: 141
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    For the record they are actually called Thermistors. They were used in CRT monitors and televisions among other things. They are used for voltage regulation, volume control, time delays, and circuit protection. In CRT's they were used for the degaussing circuit to wipe off the previous image on the screen. The number you see on the side (-050 and -090) are trip points, the larger the number the more they could handle before tripping. Unfortunately they would trip easier the more times they were tripped. My SDA's polyswitches were so wore out that they would trip very very easily. Even with good amplification they would trip at about 20-30 watts. When we replace them with resistors we use a .5 ohm resistor to closely equate the resistance of the Thermistor(polyswitch) circuit so the tweeter is not too hot (loud).

    If I remember correctly the -050 was used in speakers that had a .75amp fast blow fuse for protection. The -090 was used in speakers that had used a 1amp fast blow fuse.

    Yes Im familiar with them. None of the speakers they were removed from had fuses. Maybe in polks earlier days.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 16,774
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    For the record they are actually called Thermistors. They were used in CRT monitors and televisions among other things. They are used for voltage regulation, volume control, time delays, and circuit protection. In CRT's they were used for the degaussing circuit to wipe off the previous image on the screen. The number you see on the side (-050 and -090) are trip points, the larger the number the more they could handle before tripping. Unfortunately they would trip easier the more times they were tripped. My SDA's polyswitches were so wore out that they would trip very very easily. Even with good amplification they would trip at about 20-30 watts. When we replace them with resistors we use a .5 ohm resistor to closely equate the resistance of the Thermistor(polyswitch) circuit so the tweeter is not too hot (loud).

    If I remember correctly the -050 was used in speakers that had a .75amp fast blow fuse for protection. The -090 was used in speakers that had used a 1amp fast blow fuse.

    Yes Im familiar with them. None of the speakers they were removed from had fuses. Maybe in polks earlier days.

    Yes they replaced the fuse holders Polk previously used instead of the polyswitch. Polk also pre tripped them so they would trip easier at the desired point.
  • sansuibutchsansuibutch Posts: 141
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    For the record they are actually called Thermistors. They were used in CRT monitors and televisions among other things. They are used for voltage regulation, volume control, time delays, and circuit protection. In CRT's they were used for the degaussing circuit to wipe off the previous image on the screen. The number you see on the side (-050 and -090) are trip points, the larger the number the more they could handle before tripping. Unfortunately they would trip easier the more times they were tripped. My SDA's polyswitches were so wore out that they would trip very very easily. Even with good amplification they would trip at about 20-30 watts. When we replace them with resistors we use a .5 ohm resistor to closely equate the resistance of the Thermistor(polyswitch) circuit so the tweeter is not too hot (loud).

    If I remember correctly the -050 was used in speakers that had a .75amp fast blow fuse for protection. The -090 was used in speakers that had used a 1amp fast blow fuse.

    Yes Im familiar with them. None of the speakers they were removed from had fuses. Maybe in polks earlier days.

    Yes they replaced the fuse holders Polk previously used instead of the polyswitch. Polk also pre tripped them so they would trip easier at the desired point.

    Gotchya. Thats makes sense.
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