Replacement Amp Board on PSW110?

I have a PSW110 that seems to be damaged (started making cracking sounds at low volumes). It is out of warranty.

I emailed Polk CS and quickly got back a helpful reply suggesting that the Amp board was faulty and that I could purchase a replacement one for $100 + tax and shipping. The representative gave me a part # as well: RF1137-2.

I've replied several times for more information but never received another reply, so trying here. My questions are: is this the type of repair I can do at home? And is there an online store to buy the replacement parts?

Thanks

Comments

  • stevepstevep Posts: 89
    You can swap the board at home but repairing the actual amplifier board yourself is beyond the scope of most individuals. You can order the replacement from Polk Customer Service (1-800-377-7655) or from The Speaker Exchange http://reconingspeakers.com/product/polk-psw110-amplifier-assembly/

    Polk replaced mine under warranty back in 2012 but the replacement is now also failing so unless they have made design changes you can expect future failures.
  • atorgatorg Posts: 2
    I called Polk and they actually sent me the part for free even though I was slightly out of warranty. Replacing the part was straightforward and the sub works like new. Another Polk CS success story!
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 31,439
    You can probably pick up a whole PSW 110 on the used market for under 100 bucks. Personally, for the 100 bucks, I'd look at other subs or at least move up to the 505.
    HT SYSTEM-
    Sony 850c 4k
    Pioneer elite vhx 21
    Sony 4k BRP
    SVS SB-2000
    Polk Sig. 20's
    Polk FX500 surrounds

    Cables-
    Acoustic zen Satori speaker cables
    Acoustic zen Matrix 2 IC's
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    Audio metallurgy ga-o digital cable

    Kitchen

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  • spexspex Posts: 2
    we stock this amp if you need it. www.speakerex.com
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 31,439
    Even at Speakerex, the amp is 100+ bucks, you can buy a whole other used sub for that price....possibly even better. Throw in 50 bucks and you might come away with a 505 on the used markets.
    HT SYSTEM-
    Sony 850c 4k
    Pioneer elite vhx 21
    Sony 4k BRP
    SVS SB-2000
    Polk Sig. 20's
    Polk FX500 surrounds

    Cables-
    Acoustic zen Satori speaker cables
    Acoustic zen Matrix 2 IC's
    Wireworld eclipse 7 ic's
    Audio metallurgy ga-o digital cable

    Kitchen

    Sonos zp90
    Grant Fidelity tube dac
    B&k 1430
    Tad 803 speakers
  • stevep wrote: »
    You can swap the board at home but repairing the actual amplifier board yourself is beyond the scope of most individuals. You can order the replacement from Polk Customer Service (1-800-377-7655) or from The Speaker Exchange http://reconingspeakers.com/product/polk-psw110-amplifier-assembly/

    Polk replaced mine under warranty back in 2012 but the replacement is now also failing so unless they have made design changes you can expect future failures.

    Replying to a 3 year old post...but just to help anyone who has this problem. If you know how to solder and have a Steady Hand then you can fix this issue for under $5.00 buy some capacitors 63V 47UF you will need two. You will also need thermal paste and a soldering iron and rosin core solder and a toothpick.
    Check out this blog and follow it.


    http://hesiod.blogspot.com/2016/01/how-to-fix-humming-on-polk-psw111.html?m=1

    Tips

    1.note the old capacitors and the orientation of the polarity.

    2. Twist off the old capacitors with needle-nose or tweezers twist left and right or keep going in one Direction until the capacitor breaks off from the solder joint.

    3. Heat up the backside joint and pull off the top side joint with some tweezers or needle nose pliers to remove the leftover capacitor wire/joint.

    4. Get your solder iron and heat up the back side while putting pressure with a tooth pick on the top side. Once the solder melts, the toothpick will push through, wait a couple seconds for the solder to cool down and pull the tooth pick out and you will have a nice clean hole.

    4. Install your new capacitor & clip off the excess.

    5. Use thermal paste and apply where old thermal paste was.

    6. Enjoy your repaired subwoofer.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 42,686
    Ummm.....simply desolder the original caps using a solder sucker to remove the solder leaving the holes nice and clean. That's a lot safer than trying rip a cap off via a method which could result in the cap leaking out.
    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


    President of Club Polk

  • F1nut wrote: »
    Ummm.....simply desolder the original caps using a solder sucker to remove the solder leaving the holes nice and clean. That's a lot safer than trying rip a cap off via a method which could result in the cap leaking out.

    You are correct.

    I apologize I should have added this in my post.

    - try this method at your own risk-
    - it would be best use a de-solder tool
    - I didn't want to spend more $$ nor did I have the time.
    - I have used to twist off method many times on small capacitors do not try this on larger ones...if there is any residual voltage..it could harm you.
  • ben2talkben2talk Posts: 3
    vader540is wrote: »
    F1nut wrote: »
    Ummm.....simply desolder the original caps using a solder sucker to remove the solder leaving the holes nice and clean. That's a lot safer than trying rip a cap off via a method which could result in the cap leaking out.

    You are correct.

    I apologize I should have added this in my post.

    - try this method at your own risk-
    - it would be best use a de-solder tool
    - I didn't want to spend more $$ nor did I have the time.
    - I have used to twist off method many times on small capacitors do not try this on larger ones...if there is any residual voltage..it could harm you.

    You didn't mention 'use pliers to twist them off - not your teeth'. The contents (most likely that was sulfuric acid or some organic or inorganic solvent) are unlikely to cause much of a problem - add 'tissue' to the list of tools required (even I can afford that).

  • ben2talkben2talk Posts: 3
    Also looking at Dayton audio sa100 amplifier board to replace it if I can't fix it... better amp.
  • jmemaxjmemax Posts: 2
    @ben2talk Were you able to resolve the issue with replacing the capacitors, or did you opt for the Dayton board? I'm in the same boat. I posted in the CS forum, but haven't heard anything.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 42,686
    No one from Polk monitors this forum. Best to call them.
    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


    President of Club Polk

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