Get your Onkyo....from Walmart

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Comments

  • Amherst
    Amherst Posts: 695
    edited May 2010
    cstmar01 wrote: »
    then we will see the merger of the Best Buy with Wally World and Taco Bell so then I can eat a burrito, buy the TP To use later and find a TV to use in my bathroom to watch the world come to an end.

    HEHAW!


    grimmace19 wrote: »
    I would consider buying a tv from walmart if I was in the market for a new one and would do the same with an entry level receiver if the price was right and had a need for it.

    Sorry, neither would I or could I.
    Parasound C1, T3, HCA-3500, HCA-2205A, P/DD1550, Pioneer DV-79avi, Oppo BDP-83, WD Media Server W/HDD,
    Dynaudio Contour 3.3, Dynaudio Contour T2.1, Polk OWM3, Polk DSW micropro 1000 (x2),
    Pioneer Kuro 50" Plasma, Phillips Pronto Control w/Niles HT-MSU.
  • mystik610
    mystik610 Posts: 699
    edited May 2010
    Danny Tse wrote: »
    While I have not heard Onkyo's HiTB systems, I've read that they're very good. So perhaps Onkyo at Walmart will actually raise the performance bar for what are being carried there?

    I actually started with an Onkyo HTiB, which over the course of 2 years continues to evolve into what I have now.

    Their HTiB's are very good IMO, especially considering that they're priced closely to the Sony and Samsung HTiBs. You get a good receiver (some come with a TX-SR60x), a set of decently sized speakers with respectable drivers, and a pretty good sub. My old HTiB sub was comprable to the PSW10. The best part is, the whole system is connected with old fashioned speaker wire, unlike most HTiB systems, which use proprietary connectors...probably because Sony/Samsung HTiB's have such crappy amplifiers that they'll clip trying to drive 'real' speakers. This gives you the ability to start relatively with a full 7.1 system, and upgrade over-time.
    My System Showcase!

    Media Room
    Paradigm Studio 60 - Paradigm CC-690 - Paradigm ADP-390 - Epik Empire - Anthem MRX300 - Emotiva XPA-5

    Living-room
    Paradigm MilleniaOne - Rythmik F12GSE - Onkyo TX-SR805 - Adcom 5400

    Headphones
    Sennheiser Momentum Over-Ear - Shure SE215 - Fiio E18 Kunlun
  • Danny Tse
    Danny Tse Posts: 5,206
    edited May 2010
    mystik610 wrote: »
    I actually started with an Onkyo HTiB, which over the course of 2 years continues to evolve into what I have now.

    Their HTiB's are very good IMO, especially considering that they're priced closely to the Sony and Samsung HTiBs. You get a good receiver (some come with a TX-SR60x), a set of decently sized speakers with respectable drivers, and a pretty good sub. My old HTiB sub was comprable to the PSW10. The best part is, the whole system is connected with old fashioned speaker wire, unlike most HTiB systems, which use proprietary connectors...probably because Sony/Samsung HTiB's have such crappy amplifiers that they'll clip trying to drive 'real' speakers. This gives you the ability to start relatively with a full 7.1 system, and upgrade over-time.

    I believe some Onkyo HiTB actually go beyond having a 60X as the receiver....
  • cnh
    cnh Posts: 13,286
    edited May 2010
    Onkyo needs more distribution - these high end retailers are just not cutting it:
    http://www.us.onkyo.com/locations_intdealer.cfm
    hahaha

    but seriously - I wish more manufacturers would start selling their gear online themselves; cutting out the middle man and putting more money in the hands of the people that make things.

    Onkyo DOES sell their stuff online on their site....just don't expect them to sell it to you below MSRP unless you're buying refurb from Club Onkyo? The Club has some good buys from time to time...worth a look.

    As for Walmart and Onkyo, I agree....HTIB...Onkyo makes some of the BEST there...and raising the standards of what people get to hear and use is NOT a bad idea....might help the upper end as well.

    cnh
    Currently orbiting Bowie's Blackstar.!

    Polk Lsi-7s, Def Tech 8" sub, HK 3490, HK HD 990 (CDP/DAC), AKG Q701s
    [sig. changed on a monthly basis as I rotate in and out of my stash]
  • cfrizz
    cfrizz Posts: 13,414
    edited May 2010
    i don't agree with that completly, while most of BB stuff isnt all that good they sell some klipsch and polk speakers there, maybe not top of the line but certainly not bad. they have alot of bose stuff though :rolleyes: which any real audiphile knows bose is a lousy company interested in catering to idiots who find 100hz boom impressive. they have alot of nice tvs, receivers, computers, dvd players, etc. but, someone who has no idea what they are doing will usually end up with the junk they have mixed in with the good stuff.

    Actually Bose is catering to the people who don't WANT to have to figure out which IC goes in which slot, or how to go into the settings to calibrate all of the speakers etc.

    Some people simply want to plug in hear/see music/movie & go. That is what Bose gives them.

    Bose just follows the saying of "Keep It Simple Stupid!"
    Marantz AV-7705 PrePro, Classé 5 ch. 200wpc Amp, Oppo 103 BluRay, Rotel RCD-1072 CDP, Sony Bravia KDL-40R510C TV, Polk S60 Main Speakers, Boston VR-920 Center Channel, SVS NSD-12 SB12 Subwoofer, Polk DSW 400 Subwoofer, Polk FXi-3 Surround Speakers
  • yepimonfire
    yepimonfire Posts: 256
    edited May 2010
    no they attempt to defy physics and use alot of psycoacoustics
  • ibewbrother
    ibewbrother Posts: 186
    edited May 2010
    I actually think it might be a good thing. I bought my first entry level Onk at Circuit City. It just might introduce some new people to the world of home audio. After buying a cheap one they might decide to upgrade. I know the stuff I see in the WalMart here makes me want to puke in disgust, yet I always see people looking at it.
    "Making life enjoyable through expensive electronics." BillD

    Pioneer Elite SC-57
    M70 series 2 mains
    CS2 center
    M40 surround
    M30 front height
    SVS PB 12 NSD

    Carver TFM-45 (mains)
    Carver A753x (center, surround)

    320GB PS3, 42" Panasonic G10,

    M60's as a Zone 2 off of the Pioneer in the living room

    R.I.P. Onkyo TX-NR807
  • Jetmaker737
    Jetmaker737 Posts: 921
    edited May 2010
    mystik610 wrote: »
    Walmart sells Sony, Samsung, and Panasonic TV's...does that make them crap?

    No, but I hate Walmart. I'm a Walmart snob. I admit it! That place friggin disgusts me.
    System
    Luxman L-590AXII Integrated Amplifier
    Sonus Faber Cremona Loudspeakers
    PS Audio Directream Jr|Sansui TU-9900 Tuner|TEAC A-6100 RtR|Kenwood KX-1030 Cassette
  • dvran
    dvran Posts: 280
    edited May 2010
    There's nothing good about it. It will drive standards lower due to the relentless Walmart ethic of cheapening and degrading any commodity they get their hands on.

    +1000 to this.

    I worked for Hoover vacuum cleaners for 3 years in engineering and Hoover specifically makes models only sold for Walmart. Walmart has such a large market share that they can literally change the way Onkyo build their products.

    McDonalds does the same thing with beef products as well. They drive all the competitors to cheapen their product just to cater to McDonalds. This in turn cheapens or lessens the quality for the rest of us.
    ~Dan

    Projector: Epson 705HD on 106" DaLite
    TV: Samsung 50" Plasma PN50B550
    Receiver: Onkyo 607
    Fronts: Polk 1000i
    Center: Polk Csi40
    Rears: Polk Fxi30
    Sub: Velodyne Minivee 10
    PS3 and Xbox
  • cnh
    cnh Posts: 13,286
    edited May 2010
    I'm not sure about that....Onkyo has quite the market share in East Asia! And they've moved, I think, ALL of their production to Malaysia...I'm pretty sure nothing is made in Japan anymore. That move was supposed to save them big money.

    And besides....if Walmart pressures them they can always say that WRAT amps stand for Walmart Redesigned Amplifier Technology. lol

    cnh
    Currently orbiting Bowie's Blackstar.!

    Polk Lsi-7s, Def Tech 8" sub, HK 3490, HK HD 990 (CDP/DAC), AKG Q701s
    [sig. changed on a monthly basis as I rotate in and out of my stash]
  • LuSh
    LuSh Posts: 887
    edited May 2010
    Walmart dictates retail pricing. Meet my demands or goodbye. I'm purchasing 10,000 units this month and this is the price I'm paying. Walmart appeals to one thing and one thing only. The complete bottom line price. There is no service, reasonable way to listen to product. Price, Price, Price. If something doesn't sell it's being cheapened. As more inventory is purchased products must be moved down in order to meet price points. Can't do it? Figure out a way or we'll stop buying. Walmart is the worlds largest dealer of consumable goods. The one retail store has purchasing power greater then many countries GDP. They've reported total sales of 99.1 Billion in the first quarter of fiscal 2011. One would assume half a trillion dollars this fiscal year is not unreasonable. The perfect Wal-mart vision is simple: Control all of global retail to the point where our best customers are our own employee's. This quote from Reuters tells you all you need to know about 'the big picture'.

    "For the time being, Wal-Mart paints a bleak view of its U.S. customers, saying that the use of foods stamps and other government benefits to pay for its goods is up significantly from a year earlier."

    This is the best case scenario for a company that thrives on price.
  • acmf74
    acmf74 Posts: 921
    edited May 2010
    Kmart sells Adcom..


    Go figure....
  • mystik610
    mystik610 Posts: 699
    edited May 2010
    LuSh wrote: »
    Walmart dictates retail pricing. Meet my demands or goodbye. I'm purchasing 10,000 units this month and this is the price I'm paying. Walmart appeals to one thing and one thing only. The complete bottom line price. There is no service, reasonable way to listen to product. Price, Price, Price. If something doesn't sell it's being cheapened. As more inventory is purchased products must be moved down in order to meet price points. Can't do it? Figure out a way or we'll stop buying. Walmart is the worlds largest dealer of consumable goods. The one retail store has purchasing power greater then many countries GDP. They've reported total sales of 99.1 Billion in the first quarter of fiscal 2011. One would assume half a trillion dollars this fiscal year is not unreasonable. The perfect Wal-mart vision is simple: Control all of global retail to the point where our best customers are our own employee's. This quote from Reuters tells you all you need to know about 'the big picture'.

    "For the time being, Wal-Mart paints a bleak view of its U.S. customers, saying that the use of foods stamps and other government benefits to pay for its goods is up significantly from a year earlier."

    This is the best case scenario for a company that thrives on price.

    The need for companies like Walmart...and the diminished quality of goods in general is masking the deterioration of the dollar, and the deterioration of wealth in the United States...particularly in the lower and middle class. Speaking purely in terms of prices, the dollar has inflated at a comfortable rate of about 4% annually, but the quality of the goods we're purchasing has dropped much more significantly. From a relative standpoint, we're buying lower quality versions of goods at the same relative price of goods that we were purchasing 30 years ago. The growth of the buying power of the dollar and the wealth of the US is being out-paced by the rising cost of raw commodities and materials...the only way to keep the cost of end products within an affordable range and prevent hyper-inflation is to use lesser quality materials, and utilize cheaper, often lower quality, production/manufacturing methods.

    The rise of the organic movement is a blatant example of this. The quality of our food has diminished significantly in order to keep prices within a comfortable range for US consumers...growers and farmers are having to utilize downright disgusting methods of producing food sources in order to respond to the demand for reasonably priced foods. Organic foods are produced in healthier, more traditional methods...the same methods that food was affordably produced to the masses 50 years ago. The difference now is that traditionally grown and produced foods are so expensive that they've become a luxury that's only reasonably available to upper class /upper-middle class society.

    Beyond that, you have fast food chains, which have become the walmart of food for the US lower-class society. Forget organic foods....eating fast food and processed food is cheaper than cooking your own meal nowadays. Eating reasonably in general comes at a signficant cost. Filling up your shopping basket with plain ole non-organic fruits and vegetables is a lot more expensive than buying junk food and frozen foods.
    My System Showcase!

    Media Room
    Paradigm Studio 60 - Paradigm CC-690 - Paradigm ADP-390 - Epik Empire - Anthem MRX300 - Emotiva XPA-5

    Living-room
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    Headphones
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  • Amherst
    Amherst Posts: 695
    edited May 2010
    mystik610 wrote: »
    The need for companies like Walmart...and the diminished quality of goods in general is masking the deterioration of the dollar, and the deterioration of wealth in the United States...particularly in the lower and middle class. Speaking purely in terms of prices, the dollar has inflated at a comfortable rate of about 4% annually, but the quality of the goods we're purchasing has dropped much more significantly. From a relative standpoint, we're buying lower quality versions of goods at the same relative price of goods that we were purchasing 30 years ago. The growth of the buying power of the dollar and the wealth of the US is being out-paced by the rising cost of raw commodities and materials...the only way to keep the cost of end products within an affordable range and prevent hyper-inflation is to use lesser quality materials, and utilize cheaper, often lower quality, production/manufacturing methods.

    DING>DING>DING.....we have a winner.

    The bottom line that 90% of the population doesn't understand or seem to care about.
    Parasound C1, T3, HCA-3500, HCA-2205A, P/DD1550, Pioneer DV-79avi, Oppo BDP-83, WD Media Server W/HDD,
    Dynaudio Contour 3.3, Dynaudio Contour T2.1, Polk OWM3, Polk DSW micropro 1000 (x2),
    Pioneer Kuro 50" Plasma, Phillips Pronto Control w/Niles HT-MSU.
  • mystik610
    mystik610 Posts: 699
    edited May 2010
    xcapri79 wrote: »
    The furniture industry is a good example of the above. The stuff available today from the big boxes stores that is made overseas is dreadful.
    At one time, this country produced high quality furniture for resaonable prices.
    The big box stores killed that.

    The furniture industry is a perfect example of the deteriorating quality of goods, as the cost of furniture is directly related to the cost of the materials being utilized. Most people don't know what good furniture is anymore, and a lot of people I know are perfectly content with MDF furniture.

    Cheaply made furniture exists to fill in a gap created by the unattainability of high quality furniture....directly related to the unattainability of real lumber. With the deterioration of the dollar, the cost of real lumber is growing (no pun intended) further and further out of the reach of most americans. Most people don't see this, because most people don't care about the quality of their goods anymore...and as a society, we've grown used to products that crap out after 2 years.

    It doesn't help that all of our inflation indicators measure the buying power of the dollar based on the price of end goods....but as illustrated by the furniture industry, price doesn't necesarily dictate value or worth. We are buying products that have lower value/worth, for the same relative prices we were ten years ago.

    Commodity prices are a clearer indication of the buying power of a currency, but since commodities are priced in dollars, commodity prices are masking the deterioration of the dollar too! The US dollar is a massive, world-wide economic bubble, backed by a government and economy that has levered itself up to its neck it debt. Its no different from people buying houses with 95-100% of the price being financed from a bank, causing home prices to artificially deviate from true, fair-market real estate values. Prices need to be backed up by wealth/value/worth, or the bubble will inevitibly burst!
    My System Showcase!

    Media Room
    Paradigm Studio 60 - Paradigm CC-690 - Paradigm ADP-390 - Epik Empire - Anthem MRX300 - Emotiva XPA-5

    Living-room
    Paradigm MilleniaOne - Rythmik F12GSE - Onkyo TX-SR805 - Adcom 5400

    Headphones
    Sennheiser Momentum Over-Ear - Shure SE215 - Fiio E18 Kunlun