motionless drivers?

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Answers

  • diverdog
    diverdog Posts: 27
    Here's another example with no diaphragm. A plasma arc speaker.



  • FestYboy
    FestYboy Posts: 3,857
    F1nut wrote: »
    So in theory if you could rapidly heat and cool air you could cause sound waves with no moving parts.

    FAIL!

    You'd need moving parts to rapidly heat and cool air. The case is now closed.

    Please explain the requirement of moving parts to heat and cool. I can think of at least one way to achieve heat change without moving parts...
  • joecoulson
    joecoulson Posts: 4,950
    Just because we cannot see movement, does not mean it's not going on at the molecular level. The lightning is created by a moving stream of protons moving towards electrons. Maybe the idea of "motionless" is being defined as obvious to the naked eye? rather deceiving if that is the case. Also, "air" as defined in the statement about lightning also has mass, and when the air collapses around the hole/stream made by lighting, it's that mass if air moving back into place that creates the sound of thunder. Both are not "motionless".
  • diverdog
    diverdog Posts: 27
    edited August 2019
    I think the gist of this discussion is: Is there a way other than a vibrating diaphragm, ribbon, air motion transformer to generate sound and the answer is yes. Heat energy is wave that can heat air causing rapid expansion. Lasers could be used to heat air and there are no moving parts at all. Energy causes the air to heat and expand. The only moving part is the air itself. Energy is massless. Matter (the air) has mass

    Seeing a lightning bolt move through the sky and assuming the motion caused the sound of thunder is Bro science.

    If you don't like the lightning example how about wind? Can you hear wind when it hits your ears? Feel a pressure change? What causes wind? Heat energy from the sun. NO moving parts except the air itself.

    I'm not saying that heat modulation of air is a practical way to generate sound, only that it is possible

    BTW Protons do not move to electrons. In the 1700's they thought that's the way it worked. Physicists and engineers call this conventional current. Electrons are what's flowing in a wire. Protons are bound in the nuclei of atoms and don't move. (except in nuclear fission) But positively charged particles (particles missing an electron) can and do move from the ground to the cloud and meet electrons from the cloud half way.
    Post edited by diverdog on
  • F1nut
    F1nut Posts: 45,619

    FestYboy wrote: »
    F1nut wrote: »
    So in theory if you could rapidly heat and cool air you could cause sound waves with no moving parts.

    FAIL!

    You'd need moving parts to rapidly heat and cool air. The case is now closed.

    Please explain the requirement of moving parts to heat and cool. I can think of at least one way to achieve heat change without moving parts...

    Good for you. Now, go make a motionless speaker with NOTHING that moves.

    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


    President of Club Polk

  • Nightfall
    Nightfall Posts: 9,458
    Maybe he'll invent a Star Trek TNG holodeck and then inside the holodeck he'll create a pair of speakers that produce sound and it'll be considered motionless because nothing in the holodeck is actually real.
    afterburnt wrote: »
    They didn't speak a word of English, they were from South Carolina.

    Village Idiot of Club Polk
  • joecoulson
    joecoulson Posts: 4,950
    edited August 2019
  • ericerik
    ericerik Posts: 53
    Wow.. never thought of the treky approach . !! But was never into sci-fi.
    I was basically referring to an alternative to the linyer motor in the bass driver.. but like the man said. " The juice isn't worth squeezing the oranges...". Something to that effect.
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