Picked up a new Stihl chain saw

2

Comments

  • Mike ReeterMike Reeter Posts: 3,423
    Msabot1 wrote: »
    Been using my old Farm Boss for years without one problem...You made a good choice dude!..

    I had a Farm Boss that I bought new in 1980. This was before Stihl starting producing "Consumer Grade" products.

    We had an Auction in 2015, and the Ole' Stihl sold for more than I gave for it. I had cut literally a Mountain of Firewood with that saw, and it never failed me.

    You chose well Glenn, keep a sharp chain on her at all times! I used one of these for many years, inexpensive and works great.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Grizzly-T10278-Chain-Saw-Filing-Guide/110423668?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=2634&adid=22222222227052775251&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=t&wl3=151645575059&wl4=pla-262300035820&wl5=9023533&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=113500125&wl11=online&wl12=110423668&wl13=&veh=sem
    SDA SRS 2.3TL's/SDA SRS 3.1TL's/SDA CRS+4.1TL's and some other stuff
  • aprazer402aprazer402 Posts: 1,384
    Agree with all on the choice of the Stihl. I really like the fast growing, nice shape of the Bradford Pear trees, BUT, they have a small diameter trunk and everyone of these will totally collapse during a T-storm with very high 40+ mph winds or tornado. I really wanted to plant a few but have been reluctant because of their inability to stay upright. Anyone with survival stories on these?
  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    Upstatemax wrote: »


    I have Stihls sharpening kit and it works great.

    Tedious, but it gets the job done.


    I have the same kit and use it on my Echo chainsaw. Every time it needs gas I make about 2-3 strokes with the file on every cutting tooth. This keeps the chain cutting like new and it lets the saw cool for a few minutes before I refuel it.

    If you cut trees off anywhere below about 12-18" over ground height there will be dirt on the bark that will dull the chain quicker. I use a stiff bristled brush to knock most of the dirt off, it really helps.
    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 13,148
    No doubt a little dirt will dull a chain RIGHT NOW.
  • A
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    No doubt a little dirt will dull a chain RIGHT NOW.

    You wouldn’t think so but so will ice.
    Oh, Listen here mister. We got no way of understandin' this world. But we got as much sense of this bird flyin in the sky. Now there is a lot that bird don't know, but it don't change the fact that the world is happening to him all the same. What I am tryin to say is, is that the course of your life, well its changing, and you don't even see it- Forest Bondurant
  • GlennDogGlennDog Posts: 1,889
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    It is amazing what one can do using the right tools...

    The right tools need to be taken care of . . . .
    I was wondering if anybody adheres to the "chain break in period"

    Run saw for 3 minutes (no load), but No High RPMs

    Always slackened chain when done working (due to expansion/contraction)

    Should have 2 (TWO) chains in rotation, for how long (not specified)
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  • GlennDogGlennDog Posts: 1,889
    Oh, and THANKS for all the input!

    Manual also sez to flip the bar with each chain change/sharpening
    Power Rogue M180 monos & Adcom GFA 5802
    PS Audio PerfectWave Power Plant 10
    Rears Salk SuperCharged Surrounds
    DAC North Star Design Supremo
    Source PSA PWT & Oppo 205
    Pre/Pro Integra DHC 40.1
    LCD Samsung LN46B750
    Mains Salk HT2-TL
    Pre Cary SLP-98 F1
    Center Salk HT2C
    Wires MIT S3.3
    PSA PC AC-12
  • GlennDogGlennDog Posts: 1,889
    If you cut trees off anywhere below about 12-18" over ground height there will be dirt on the bark that will dull the chain quicker. I use a stiff bristled brush to knock most of the dirt off, it really helps.

    WORD! Nice Tip . . .
    Power Rogue M180 monos & Adcom GFA 5802
    PS Audio PerfectWave Power Plant 10
    Rears Salk SuperCharged Surrounds
    DAC North Star Design Supremo
    Source PSA PWT & Oppo 205
    Pre/Pro Integra DHC 40.1
    LCD Samsung LN46B750
    Mains Salk HT2-TL
    Pre Cary SLP-98 F1
    Center Salk HT2C
    Wires MIT S3.3
    PSA PC AC-12
  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    GlennDog wrote: »
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    It is amazing what one can do using the right tools...

    The right tools need to be taken care of . . . .
    I was wondering if anybody adheres to the "chain break in period"

    Run saw for 3 minutes (no load), but No High RPMs

    Always slackened chain when done working (due to expansion/contraction)

    Should have 2 (TWO) chains in rotation, for how long (not specified)

    They have you run to allow the chain oiler to do it's thing and to allow the chain to seat(they are supposed to be pre-stretched).

    Here is what I do.

    I always clean the bar grove and sprocket area when replacing a chain and I pre-oil the chain since mine is an auto oiler. I also have the oiler turned up some, the bar lasts longer. I run the saw for a few minutes not under load to warm up the engine but that's it. I just adjust as needed during use or when refueling, I check the bar oil every time it needs gas. I never loosen the chain when finished since 99 percent of the time it needs to be adjusted tighter when I'm done. I just tighten it the next time I use it. I do flip the bar over when I replace the chain, that extends bar life. I have a few chains, some are anti-kickback others aren't and I have a chipper chain too. I also keep an old bar that was almost ready to replace just incase. Bars do get screwed up sometimes. Always lift up on the bar when adjusting the chain, if you don't the bar can shift some and cause the chain to be too tight. Like I stated before I do a quick sharpen on the chain every tine I refuel the saw. When the chain needs heavy sharpening done(like when I hit a nail) I'll swap it out and sharpen it later(I cut up pallets to start fires).
    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • kharp1kharp1 Posts: 2,868
    As mentioned, KEEP IT OUT OF THE DIRT!
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  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    kharp1 wrote: »
    As mentioned, KEEP IT OUT OF THE DIRT!

    Nails are way worse then dirt, I use chains that are near the end of their lifespan if either might be an issue. Dirt is hard on the bar too, keep that in mind. If you're cutting off as close to the ground as possible using an old bar is a wise idea too.
    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • motorstereomotorstereo Posts: 1,152
    That's a great choice you've made in a acquiring a Stihl. I have many hours on an old 041 Stihl which just seemed to run forever. Occasionally I'll wonder what would've happened to the chainsaw industry had the Swedes and Germans not got involved in it. McCulloch, Homelite, Lombard and a few others American made saws were nothing short of terrible back in the day and had some catching up to do once Stihl, Jonsered, and Husqvarna hit the market years ago.
    One thing that has not been mentioned is to learn how to properly drop a tree. My cousin who had plenty of time in the woods has been sitting in a wheelchair for the past 40 years because he was "thinking about hunting" rather than paying attention to which way the tree was going to come down. It was a life changing event in a fraction of a second involving a chain saw
  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    Good point. I've learned they don't always go as planned. It's hard to know if the tree has a hollow rotten spot that might make it go the wrong way and fall way before intended. I just do it the way my dad, my uncles and others have shown me. Having a set of wedges if the tree has any size is a wise choice.

    Here's is some really good aim.



    These should be a decent how to videos.




    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • kharp1kharp1 Posts: 2,868
    Always have an egress.
    Main System:
    Joule-Electra LA 100 MKIII
    Pass Labs Aleph 30, McCormack DNA-125, Parasound A21
    Marantz SA-14S1
    Usher CP-6311/Tyler Acoustics Taylo Reference Monitor, LSA-1
    Dual SVS SB2000
    Wireworld Equinox 7 bi-wire, Wireworld Silver Eclipse 7 IC

    Secondary Rig:
    Parasound P5, Audio Electronics by Cary Constellation
    Marsh a200s, Audio Elecrtonics by Cary Hercules
    Pioneer Elite DV-45a, Denon DVD-2910
    Klipsch Epic CF-1, Vandersteen 3CE sig
    Analysus Plus Oval

  • GlennDogGlennDog Posts: 1,889
    Didn’t think I was going to watch the last video... Started to, then Bam! 50 minutes flew by
    Thanks! TNT!
    Power Rogue M180 monos & Adcom GFA 5802
    PS Audio PerfectWave Power Plant 10
    Rears Salk SuperCharged Surrounds
    DAC North Star Design Supremo
    Source PSA PWT & Oppo 205
    Pre/Pro Integra DHC 40.1
    LCD Samsung LN46B750
    Mains Salk HT2-TL
    Pre Cary SLP-98 F1
    Center Salk HT2C
    Wires MIT S3.3
    PSA PC AC-12
  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    GlennDog wrote: »
    Didn’t think I was going to watch the last video... Started to, then Bam! 50 minutes flew by
    Thanks! TNT!

    That last video is a great one. Tons of info, all good and well explained.

    Even an old sawdog could learn a new trick or two. I definitely learned from it and I have over 20 years of experience.

    It explained why I do some things I was taught and why I learned a lesson or two the hard way too.
    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • Tony MTony M Posts: 7,752
    GlennDog wrote: »
    Had high winds blow through here the other day that split one of the Bradford Pears down the middle

    Instead of hiring a schmuk to clean it all up, I ponied up the dough and bought a Stihl MS 251, and I became the schmuk that cleaned it up

    this thing made short work of a mess. Seriously, it was like a hot knife thru "butta"

    I've got little experience with these saws, but relied on a local, well respected brick 'n mortar for advice

    This thing rocks! $$ well spent!

    We just had the BEST Tree surgeons in our area cut down 3 trees and heavily trimmed a row of Red Tips running down our drive way. They used only Stihl chain says of varying sizes and a COOL little straight shafted Stihl weed and hedge trimmer with interchangeable attachments. It was kind of quite. The guy used a powerful 2 1/2 ft. hedge trimmer attachment first and then used a short chain saw attachment that was also powerful. I looked up the model but have forgotten it now. It's brand new so it wouldn't be hard to relocate it. It's not cheap but it's not out of this world pricey either. My wife and I want one.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • scubalabscubalab Posts: 2,602
    Great videos. That tongue and groove cut (near the end of the last video) is ingenious to determine which way the felled tree is moving.
  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,728
    I guess I'm an idiot for getting a Husqvarna Rancher 450.
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
  • muncybobmuncybob Posts: 2,032
    edited October 2017
    Nuttin' wrong with that saw!

    I run a Jonsered saw(almost a husky clone). 60 cc and handles about anything until you get to really large trees...which I tend to avoid.
    Yep, my name really is Bob.
    Parasound HCA1500, Dynaco PAS4, Denon DP1200 w/Shure V15 Type V and Jico SAS stylus, Oppo BDP93, "upgraded" Polk SDA 2B.
  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,728
    Well, I was shopping and with the new property I have, a "home owner"/consumer level saw was not enough and a commercial level saw was a bit out of my needs/skill set.

    I actually called Husqvarna's CS department and they recommended this Rancher 450 because it's rebuild-able like their commercial models and you can easily change bar size up to 20 inches or 24 inches, I can't remember off-hand. But it's priced for a consumer level unit without some of the fancy stuff. The engine is also the bottom-rung engine from the commercial models.

    So I got it on special from Lowe's and got my 5% discount and then Husqvarna emailed me a rebate so I got like $100 off!

    Also, I was worried that it was going to be a "big box model", like how, like Kohler builds a faucet for Home Depot priced at $150 and you go get the same faucet from a plumbing supply house and it's $400? Kohler has a "Home Depot" product and a regular product. The HD one is built with cheap parts to meet the price point. The guy at Husqvarna said "We do not do that. If you buy a Husqie from Lowe's or an authorized idependent dealer, you are getting the same Husqie. Lowe's is not an authorized service center but you can take your Husqie to any authorized service center no matter where you bought it."

    So I got the Husqie because it was less than the Stihl and actually is one of only a few saws that gets better ratings than it's comparable Stihl.

    Plus, I just bought a huge chunk of land and I'm broke. Can't afford a Stihl right now.
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 13,148
    Jstas wrote: »
    I guess I'm an idiot for getting a Husqvarna Rancher 450.
    muncybob wrote: »
    Nuttin' wrong with that saw!

    I run a Jonsered saw(almost a husky clone). 60 cc and handles about anything until you get to really large trees...which I tend to avoid.

    Nothing wrong with either both good saws. When I was researching saws I went to both our local small engine repair places both are outdoor equipment sellers as well. Both said darn near the same thing. Both are great saws until you need repair parts. I guess both companies are very slow in shipping parts to their dealers. I was told all four saws Stihl,Echo,Husqvarna and Jonsered are workhorses. I bought a Echo for myself. It also has the ability to switch to a larger bar as well as both models use the same motor.
  • TNTsTunesTNTsTunes Posts: 756
    pitdogg2 wrote: »

    Nothing wrong with either both good saws. When I was researching saws I went to both our local small engine repair places both are outdoor equipment sellers as well. Both said darn near the same thing. Both are great saws until you need repair parts. I guess both companies are very slow in shipping parts to their dealers. I was told all four saws Stihl,Echo,Husqvarna and Jonsered are workhorses. I bought a Echo for myself. It also has the ability to switch to a larger bar as well as both models use the same motor.

    Which Echo did you get? I sold my big chainsaws and bought a CS400 a few years later for some clean up some storm damage and thin a wooded area behind my property. It get's used a couple of times a year since then and has been great. I do like Stihl chains, they seem to hold up the better.



    "Make a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day. Light
    a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life."

  • exalted512exalted512 Posts: 10,796
    Tony M wrote: »
    GlennDog wrote: »
    Had high winds blow through here the other day that split one of the Bradford Pears down the middle

    Instead of hiring a schmuk to clean it all up, I ponied up the dough and bought a Stihl MS 251, and I became the schmuk that cleaned it up

    this thing made short work of a mess. Seriously, it was like a hot knife thru "butta"

    I've got little experience with these saws, but relied on a local, well respected brick 'n mortar for advice

    This thing rocks! $$ well spent!

    We just had the BEST Tree surgeons in our area cut down 3 trees and heavily trimmed a row of Red Tips running down our drive way. They used only Stihl chain says of varying sizes and a COOL little straight shafted Stihl weed and hedge trimmer with interchangeable attachments. It was kind of quite. The guy used a powerful 2 1/2 ft. hedge trimmer attachment first and then used a short chain saw attachment that was also powerful. I looked up the model but have forgotten it now. It's brand new so it wouldn't be hard to relocate it. It's not cheap but it's not out of this world pricey either. My wife and I want one.

    most likely the Kombi system I mentioned earlier.
    Music is like candy, you have to get rid of the rappers to enjoy it
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 13,148
    TNTsTunes wrote: »
    pitdogg2 wrote: »

    Nothing wrong with either both good saws. When I was researching saws I went to both our local small engine repair places both are outdoor equipment sellers as well. Both said darn near the same thing. Both are great saws until you need repair parts. I guess both companies are very slow in shipping parts to their dealers. I was told all four saws Stihl,Echo,Husqvarna and Jonsered are workhorses. I bought a Echo for myself. It also has the ability to switch to a larger bar as well as both models use the same motor.

    Which Echo did you get? I sold my big chainsaws and bought a CS400 a few years later for some clean up some storm damage and thin a wooded area behind my property. It get's used a couple of times a year since then and has been great. I do like Stihl chains, they seem to hold up the better.



    CS-490

  • Tony MTony M Posts: 7,752
    edited October 2017
    most likely the Kombi system I mentioned earlier. [/quote]

    I believe you are correct !
    I didn't know there were Kombi kits available. Stihl KM131 most likely ...

    Those Kombi tool machines ATE those RED-TIP hedge bushes up.
    There was the foreman also using a really small Stihl chain saw for the really thick trunk lines in the hedges. They had the 20+ high hedge cut down to 6' in a very short time. Again, those 3 tools were quite. NICE.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • muncybobmuncybob Posts: 2,032
    [quote=Both are great saws until you need repair parts. I guess both companies are very slow in shipping parts to their dealers. [/quote]

    In all the years I've run my Jonsey 630 Super II I only needed parts once and it was fairly easy to get....got lucky I guess. If you have the same performance out of the Husky that my saw has given me it may well be the only saw you ever need. I'm running an 18" bar and don't feel the need for anything bigger...besides, longer bar and more sharpening :)

    Yep, my name really is Bob.
    Parasound HCA1500, Dynaco PAS4, Denon DP1200 w/Shure V15 Type V and Jico SAS stylus, Oppo BDP93, "upgraded" Polk SDA 2B.
  • billbillwbillbillw Posts: 5,812
    I've got an old (early 90s?) Stihl 027 that I picked up used in 2014 for something like $175.

    In warm weather, it starts with 2-3 pulls. In cold, it takes a few more, but always runs great. I've had about 6 large trees fall in my yard since then, and it has been a huge money saver. Learn how to sharpen your blades and it will keep cutting like a champ for years.
    Main 2-ch:
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  • billbillwbillbillw Posts: 5,812
    Jstas wrote: »
    ...I actually called Husqvarna's CS department and they recommended this Rancher 450 because it's rebuild-able like their commercial models and you can easily change bar size up to 20 inches or 24 inches, I can't remember off-hand. But it's priced for a consumer level unit without some of the fancy stuff. The engine is also the bottom-rung engine from the commercial models.

    Nothing wrong at all with the Husqvarna 450 models. It will probably do everything you need it to do for 10-20 years.

    However, their Customer Service gave you a line of BS. The 450 engine is not in any way comparable to their commercial models. The commercial models have alloy (magnesium?) split cases and easily removable cylinder jugs. The 450 (as well as all their other consumer/rancher models) have plastic "clamshell" case design that is much more difficult to repair. But don't worry. You won't need to rebuild it unless you are cutting every day for years like a tree professional.

    This is the same with Stihl, Husqvarna, Jonsered, etc.

    Bottom line, most home owners, even if they have a huge property with lots of trees to clear, will do fine with a plastic case 'homeowners' saw. My Dad took down 20+ large oak trees with an old plastic case Stihl back in the 1980s.
    Main 2-ch:
    Sony SS-M9; LSA Statement Amplifier; VPI HW-19 Mk3/Sumiko Premier FT-4/Audio Technica AT15SA; Pass Labs DIY Pearl Phono; Sony SCD-C333ES SACD Changer; TEAC UD-301 DAC; Dell/WYSE 5010 (running Daphile); Sony ST-SA5ES Tuner; Nanotec Golden Strada speaker cables (SR+#79 Shotgun); Audioquest Coral interconnects
  • JstasJstas Posts: 13,728
    That's not what he meant.

    The case has little to do with the actual engine that powers the saw. The case is not structural to the engine crankcase or cylinder head. The engine itself, not the case, is the same as the base level engine in their commercial series. Yes the pretty parts are plastic but they are replaceable if broken and affecting the operation of the saw. Any engine is rebuild-able. Being from the commercial line of engines, though, an authorized service center will have the majority of parts in stock all the time for fast turnaround. That's the benefit, not that it will run forever.

    I really couldn't care less about how pretty my tools are. I just want them to work and if I have to fix them, I don't want to have to get myself a voodoo priest and grow a 3rd arm to be able to fix them. Nor do I want to have to spend the cost of a new tool repairing the old tool.
    You're just jealous 'cause the voices don't talk to you!
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