Looking for 130 decibels using headphones

I'm trying to figure out what I should be looking for, when it comes to headphones that will put out at least 130 decibels. I am deaf, for all intents and purposes anyway, but can pick up sounds at 127 decibels and up.
My question and my problem: I have a 40 watt amp, which I can daisy-chain to a headphone booster, giving me around 120 decibels but my headphones keep blowing out.
So the question: What do I look for, in a set of headphones that will deliver? Ohms, Hz to kHz, mm of drivers, what do I even ASK for, search for? The headphones that I have to keep replacing seem to do the best as far as loudness, and they are 40mm drivers with 20Hz to 20kHz. They can't tell me the ohms on that model headphones, but I've found that the higher the ohms the quieter the headphones. 32 ohms is too quiet, for instance. But I don't know what to look for. Can anyone here, help me to (if not understand) know the right thing to ASK when looking for headphones that will deliver the right decibels, the most decibels? Thank you in advance, I appreciate your patience with someone like me who knows jack **** about this kind of thing.
«1

Comments

  • KennethSwaugerKennethSwauger Moderator Posts: 6,581
    Hello,
    Interesting question.
    Wouldn't it be better to use hearing aids and then use headphones playing at lower volume?
    "And the house you live in will never fall down
    If you pity the stranger who stands at your gate" G.Lightfoot
  • rooftop59rooftop59 Posts: 4,483
    Hello,
    Interesting question.
    Wouldn't it be better to use hearing aids and then use headphones playing at lower volume?

    I’m guessing hearing aids are too expensive?

    To the op, I normally would not recommend them, but have tried beats? Those are designed for bass and volume, so they might work.

    Second, have you tried professional in ear monitors? Playing on stage in a rock band gets really frigging loud, so I would think those might work...
    HT Rig:
    Denon AVR-X4200w; Peachtree Audio Nova Integrated; Bryson BPD-1; Mains: Dynaudio Emit 10 + MartinLogan Dynamo (original) sub; Center - Polk cs400i; Heights, Center Surround - Klipsch KHC - 6 In-Ceiling; Surrounds - Monoprice in-ceiling; Sub - SVS PB10-ISD; LG UP870 4K BDP

    Master Bedroom
    Marantz SR-5007; Peachtree Audio NovaPre; Audiosource Amp Two, PSB Imagine B, Boston VR-10 center, NHT Super One CI surrounds, ACI Titan subwoofer, Squeezebox Touch
  • NightfallNightfall Posts: 7,545
    I had a pair of Koss headphones back in High School that when connected to the headphone out of my then Pioneer SX-something or other could blow your doors off. I could set the headphones on the table, turn them up, and hear them clearly from the other room. I can't remember the model number for the life of me though.

    I think your best bet for keeping headphones alive at high volume is EQ'ing out a bunch of the bass.
    afterburnt wrote: »
    They didn't speak a word of English, they were from South Carolina.
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 29,560
    Hello,
    Interesting question.
    Wouldn't it be better to use hearing aids and then use headphones playing at lower volume?

    Yes, but unfortunately hearing aids do not transmit sound in the manner we audio nuts are accustomed to. In other words, for music, they sound like crap.

    I can't imagine though, if one has hearing problems, the higher decibels would be good in the long term. Taking a bad situation and making it worse.
    HT SYSTEM-
    Pioneer elite vhx 21
    Sony 4k BRP
    Tad 803 bookies
    Polk 500 surrounds
    Polk s35 center
    SVS SB-2000
    Sonos

    Music-

    Joule la-100 pre
    B&k 1403 amp
    Cary xciter dac
    Cullen modded Sonos
    ERA D5 bookies

    Cables-
    Acoustic zen Satori speaker cables
    Analysis plus crystal oval ic's
    Wireworld eclipse 7 ic's
    Audio metallurgy ga-o digital cable
  • delkaldelkal Posts: 284
    I would talk to your doctor before you just start cranking things up. 130DB's can do damage. Whether or not you can hear it......it will still do damage.

    I hate to say it but you might want to save the remaining hearing you have for more important things in life and not fry the rest just listening to music. (and I can't believe I said that)

  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    I'm thinking scrambled brains would be the result.

    Strap on a bass shaker with some mid speaker of somekind to get vibrations through your body instead.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 29,560
    edited April 27
    We may have touched on the next product development for Bose....hearing aids. Maybe Polk can beat them to the punch with sda hearing aids.
    HT SYSTEM-
    Pioneer elite vhx 21
    Sony 4k BRP
    Tad 803 bookies
    Polk 500 surrounds
    Polk s35 center
    SVS SB-2000
    Sonos

    Music-

    Joule la-100 pre
    B&k 1403 amp
    Cary xciter dac
    Cullen modded Sonos
    ERA D5 bookies

    Cables-
    Acoustic zen Satori speaker cables
    Analysis plus crystal oval ic's
    Wireworld eclipse 7 ic's
    Audio metallurgy ga-o digital cable
  • ken brydsonken brydson Posts: 7,084
    tonyb wrote: »
    We may have touched on the next product development for Bose....hearing aids. Maybe Polk can beat them to the punch with sda hearing aids.

    Powered by Alexa..
    HT/Main- Panny 50" G10 Plasma, Pioneer SC-1222k AVR, Panny DMP-BD60 BDP, Polk LS90 mains, CS350LS center, LS/fx side surrounds, LS50 surround backs, SVS 25-31PC+ sub, Harmony One

    Office Rig- Marantz 2252B, Denon 2910, Kenwood KD2070 TT, Polk RTA 12B's/ RTA8t
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    And sold only through Amazon Prime.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • BlueFoxBlueFox Posts: 10,088
    Maybe it’s me, but it just seems there is something wrong with pounding your ears at 130 dB+ just to ‘hear’ music. At that level you should be able to ‘hear’ without headphones. When I blew up my original Magico S5s I was literally being pounded by the sound. While I wasn’t using my SPL at the time, I doubt it was near 130 dB.
    Bud - Silicon Valley

    Lumin S1
    Sony XA-5400ES SACD
    Pass XP-22 pre, X600.5 amps
    Magico S5 MKII Mcast Rose speakers, SPOD spikes

    Shunyata Triton v3/Typhon QR on source, Denali 2000 (2) on amps
    Shunyata Sigma XLR analog ICs, Sigma speaker cables
    Shunyata Sigma HC (2), Sigma Analog, Sigma Digital, Z Anaconda (3) power cables

    Mapleshade Samson V.3 four shelf solid maple rack, Micropoint brass footers
    Three 20 amp circuits.
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 9,876
    delkal wrote: »
    I would talk to your doctor before you just start cranking things up. 130DB's can do damage. Whether or not you can hear it......it will still do damage.

    I hate to say it but you might want to save the remaining hearing you have for more important things in life and not fry the rest just listening to music. (and I can't believe I said that)

    Maybe the damage has already been done
    If so see 1st response from Ken...if not PLEASE LOOK AT THIS DB chart
    5v75t8o3l55n.jpg
    2-channel: Modwright KWI-200 Integrated, Dynaudio C1-II Signatures
    Desktop rig: LSi7, Polk 110sub, Dayens Ampino amp, W4S DAC/pre, Sonos, JRiver
    Gear on standby: Melody 101 tube pre, Unison Research Simply Italy Integrated
    Gone to new homes: (Matt Polk's)Threshold Stasis SA12e monoblocks, Pass XA30.5 amp, Usher MD2 speakers, Dynaudio C4 platinum speakers, Modwright LS100 (voltz), Simaudio 780D DAC
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    edited April 28
    96dbs was ridiculous in my cottage. But I can hear. But I think the original poster is in the realm of needing vibrations now. That's why I posted what I did before.

    The original poster probably has other people he/she doesn't want to bother. So strap on that bass shaker and some other speaker that will vibrate the highs and they will have the 130 dbs of sound waves going thru them if he/she will be able to take that inhumane volume pressure levels.

    I also thought about Klipsch speakers placed on each side of the head. KLF20's would do. Klipsch Heresy's would do too. :s

    Goodbye to the rest of their hearing though!
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • PlasticmaskPlasticmask Posts: 7
    Tony M wrote: »
    I'm thinking scrambled brains would be the result.

    Strap on a bass shaker with some mid speaker of somekind to get vibrations through your body instead.
    delkal wrote: »
    I would talk to your doctor before you just start cranking things up. 130DB's can do damage. Whether or not you can hear it......it will still do damage.

    I hate to say it but you might want to save the remaining hearing you have for more important things in life and not fry the rest just listening to music. (and I can't believe I said that)

    It doesn't work that way for my kind of deafness (I won't bore you). But thanks for the concern. My hearing aids are 139 dB and my brain isn't fried, so worry thou not. No, I'm looking for only 130 dB from a set of headphones. Can anyone help?
  • ClipdatClipdat Posts: 4,509
    edited May 4
    Look into headphones marketed toward DJ use, they have higher power handling.

    https://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-RP-DH1250-S-Technics-Pro-Headphone/dp/B00A17IAOA/

    Those have "3500mW handling capacity". That's 3.5w if I'm not a total moron?

    https://www.pioneerdj.com/en-us/product/headphones/hdj-x10/black/overview/

    Here's some Pioneers that look impressive as well.

    Edit: Here's some Sony headphones with an impressive 4000mw handling capacity: https://www.amazon.com/Sony-MDR7520-Professional-Studio-Headphones/dp/B004Z58VZ2
    It doesn't work that way for my kind of deafness (I won't bore you). But thanks for the concern. My hearing aids are 139 dB and my brain isn't fried, so worry thou not. No, I'm looking for only 130 dB from a set of headphones. Can anyone help?

    Got Dayens?
  • PlasticmaskPlasticmask Posts: 7
    It's also less for music and more for things like Netflix and YouTube, for my PC at home. I want to use headphones instead of something to have to cram into my ears, headphones are infinitely more comfortable than the hearing aids, trust me on that one. I also agree, less bass (MUCH LESS BASS) and more treble is what I do with my current equipment. It's just not quite loud enough. Surely there has to be a set of headphones out there on Earth that will meet my needs. I've found some with 50mm drivers and they boast 4,000mW but wonder if they'll help me before I spend the money. I've been through probably a dozen sets of headphones, frying them and having to return them, because they just can't manage the volume I'm requiring. Honestly, I appreciate it but I don't need advice regarding my hearing... :) I'm needing advice regarding headphones that will produce 130 dB of sound. Please? Can anyone help me?
  • ClipdatClipdat Posts: 4,509
    Now I'm realizing that those are only spec'd to put out 106db. So, I'm not sure man. Sorry.
    Got Dayens?
  • FestYboyFestYboy Posts: 2,657
    The Sony MDR-7506 will get you at least 124dB at ear to driver distance. They're rated at 106 at 1 meter! Apply the inverse square law here and at just over 1cm, I got 124dB. I also have experience with them in the field, they are LOUD, and will hold more than their rated 1000mW power handling. Plus you can easily rebuild them if you blow a driver.
  • rooftop59rooftop59 Posts: 4,483
    Sorry man, but I don't know if you'll find headphones that will do this, but perhaps professional in-ear monitors would (as I suggested above). Looks of rock bands play for several hours with those in, so perhaps they are more comfortable than hearing aids?

    This must be a frustrating situation. Surely you are not the only person with this condition, which makes me surprised that there is no commercial solution available?
    HT Rig:
    Denon AVR-X4200w; Peachtree Audio Nova Integrated; Bryson BPD-1; Mains: Dynaudio Emit 10 + MartinLogan Dynamo (original) sub; Center - Polk cs400i; Heights, Center Surround - Klipsch KHC - 6 In-Ceiling; Surrounds - Monoprice in-ceiling; Sub - SVS PB10-ISD; LG UP870 4K BDP

    Master Bedroom
    Marantz SR-5007; Peachtree Audio NovaPre; Audiosource Amp Two, PSB Imagine B, Boston VR-10 center, NHT Super One CI surrounds, ACI Titan subwoofer, Squeezebox Touch
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    Sorry.

    I mentioned vibrational approach but you ignored it or don't think it's worthy of a response.

    Good luck. I also think the hearing impaired medical field would have SOMETHING you're looking for.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
  • verbverb Posts: 2,968
    Hello @Plasticmask very sorry for your condition. I did find these:
    h1jqj2ly1d4e.png
    Basement: Polk SDA 1C's, Micro Seiki MB14 TT, Rotel 1580 Pre, Marantz CD6006 CDP, Carver TX8 Tuner, Conrad Johnson MF2300A Amp, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, AQ Diamondback (version 1) RCA IC's, MIT Terminator2 Cables
    Office: PC, Marantz AMP-1, Acoustic Technologies Classic Speakers, Polk PSWi225 wireless sub, MIT AVt2 cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable
    Spare Room: Dayens Ampino Integrated, Auris BluMe, Polk TSi200's
    Living Room: Pioneer SX-N30 Network Receiver, Pioneer PD10AE CD Player, Furman M8-LX Power Conditioner, Polk RT265 In Wall Speakers, Polk DSW Pro 660wi Subwoofer
  • verbverb Posts: 2,968
    Looks like they a few offerings. This guy is >130db
    xrtkowe0vzxs.png
    Basement: Polk SDA 1C's, Micro Seiki MB14 TT, Rotel 1580 Pre, Marantz CD6006 CDP, Carver TX8 Tuner, Conrad Johnson MF2300A Amp, Furman 15PFi Power Conditioner, AQ Diamondback (version 1) RCA IC's, MIT Terminator2 Cables
    Office: PC, Marantz AMP-1, Acoustic Technologies Classic Speakers, Polk PSWi225 wireless sub, MIT AVt2 cables, IFI Purifier2, AQ Cinnamon USB cable
    Spare Room: Dayens Ampino Integrated, Auris BluMe, Polk TSi200's
    Living Room: Pioneer SX-N30 Network Receiver, Pioneer PD10AE CD Player, Furman M8-LX Power Conditioner, Polk RT265 In Wall Speakers, Polk DSW Pro 660wi Subwoofer
  • stuweestuwee Posts: 1,532
    You need to talk to these guys, https://www.headphone.com/, they've been around forever, I would trust their advice. I feel you are blessed to be able to hear at certain levels, truly blessed that you want to hear, just awesome!! I hope you find what you seek!
    Thorens TD125MKII, SME3009,Shure V15/ Teac V-8000S, Denon DN-790R cass, Teac 3340 RtR decks, Onix CD2...Sumo Electra Plus pre>SAE A1001 amp>Martin Logan Summit's
  • EmlynEmlyn Posts: 2,104
    Looks like closed back headphones with large planar magnetic drivers could get the job done. Polk does not specialize in anything like that. May be best to get in contact with Audeze and explain the condition to them. They could either describe what kind of source and amp it takes to produce that kind of SPL with their closed back headphones or say "use at your own risk." I suspect they would say the latter since no company is likely to recommend anyone use their products at an SPL that would produce liability for them. That's why companies put legal disclaimers all over.
    1. Polk LSiM707, 704C, 703; Dual SVS SB2000 subwoofers; Marantz SR7011 receiver; Parasound A23 amp; Oppo 205; Toshiba HD-DVD Player; Sony 65" 4K TV; FIOS; PS Audio Power Plant Premier; MIT S2 cables
    2. JM Labs Electra 920.1; Parasound JC2 Preamp; Sonic Frontiers Power 2 amp; Sony HAP-Z1ES; Oppo 105D; Music Hall MMF7 and Acoustech phono pre; PS Audio P1000; MIT S1 Cables
    3. Polk LSiM703; Pioneer Elite SC97 receiver; Oppo 203; Squeezebox Touch; MIT S3 cables
  • PlasticmaskPlasticmask Posts: 7
    Tony M wrote: »
    Sorry.

    I mentioned vibrational approach but you ignored it or don't think it's worthy of a response.

    Good luck. I also think the hearing impaired medical field would have SOMETHING you're looking for.

    I'm sorry; I thought that I had answered this one. Honestly, I did. My hearing is a neurological thing, has to do with an illness that took forever to diagnose and about six months to cure. And it gave me epilepsy and made me deaf as a toaster. Vibrational approach: I thought you were meaning "bone induction" hearing aid (not bone induction hearing aids, but aid with bone induction, which is how that works), however does not work on me as I really did think I that had told ...someone on here, I thought it was you.
    My apologies. Truly.
    ALL of your responses are worthy of attending to; to be honest with you I didn't expect this many. To those that I missed: NO DISRESPECT IS INTENDED. I am GRATEFUL for this help. VERY much so.
    And to the person that opined it would trash what little hearing I'm capable of: My hearing aids are Phonaks that top off at 139 decibels and there is no pain, no damage, just a little bit of help in large gatherings or other places that make it hard to lipread everyone in a room.
    And my hearing is going to finish going away all by itself, with no help from me nor a 130dB producing set of headphones :smile: However I DO appreciate the concern. I really do. Just as I appreciate all of these responses.
    ALL of this is very helpful to me, I'm learning a lot in here. I just don't get a lot of time in the day to come here to read, I wish that I did because every time I do, there seem to be ten more responses, all of them food for thought and VERY useful links. Some of them didn't pan out, a couple of the others just might be what I'm after.

    I am beginning to understand that I'm going to have to pay to have some custom made, as long as it's not like a grand (and we've all seen 1,500 dollar headphones, I just don't have that much in the way of readies for that expenditure) so... who should I ask to build them? Beyerdynamics might like the challenge, and all of their headphones are hand made to begin with.

    I haven't checked yet, on the model mentioned that can be disassembled at home and the drivers changed out when they fry. I will be doing that when next I have time.

    Again, please know how grateful I am for this help. It's VERY valuable to me.
  • rooftop59rooftop59 Posts: 4,483
    I'm sorry man, that really sucks. I wish I could help more, but I really don't have any knowledge in this area. Good luck!
    HT Rig:
    Denon AVR-X4200w; Peachtree Audio Nova Integrated; Bryson BPD-1; Mains: Dynaudio Emit 10 + MartinLogan Dynamo (original) sub; Center - Polk cs400i; Heights, Center Surround - Klipsch KHC - 6 In-Ceiling; Surrounds - Monoprice in-ceiling; Sub - SVS PB10-ISD; LG UP870 4K BDP

    Master Bedroom
    Marantz SR-5007; Peachtree Audio NovaPre; Audiosource Amp Two, PSB Imagine B, Boston VR-10 center, NHT Super One CI surrounds, ACI Titan subwoofer, Squeezebox Touch
  • PlasticmaskPlasticmask Posts: 7
    FestYboy wrote: »
    The Sony MDR-7506 will get you at least 124dB at ear to driver distance. They're rated at 106 at 1 meter! Apply the inverse square law here and at just over 1cm, I got 124dB. I also have experience with them in the field, they are LOUD, and will hold more than their rated 1000mW power handling. Plus you can easily rebuild them if you blow a driver.

    THIS is what I'm going to try. eBay: I've already bid on two sets, and have found replacement drivers for them priced at $30 for a set of two. SO the cheap drivers probably aren't original, probably aren't Sony I mean, not when I see Sony drivers priced at $80 for just one. However, I find that it is worth it to me to find out. The fact that you added that it's easy to rebuild when I blow the drivers, sold me. Easy is good. Easy is very good. Thank you, honestly. I appreciate this. If they don't work out, they don't work out, but you tried to give the advice and I'm going to TAKE the advice and see what happens. Thanks again.
  • PlasticmaskPlasticmask Posts: 7
    I'm also going to find an equalizer proggy to help tune out the bass and perhaps prolong the drivers in the process. I can't find the poster who suggested that, but when I asked a sound engineer (friend of my Brother's) he agreed that not only would it probably help with making the drivers last longer but it MIGHT help me to get another couple of decibels out of them. Which is good. Very good. So thank you for that advice as well.

    Listen, (that's a deaf pun, did you catch it? I'll do it again) listen, thank you all HUGELY for all of these suggestions. You've no idea how much you've educated me and I was a complete noob until I met this forum. Most forums, you probably know, are usually filled with drunken smart*sses who withhold what they know whilst making crude and unhelpful insulting remarks to amuse themselves and their friends on the forum.

    I didn't find that, here. This is a good group of people. Just wanted to let you know that. I'm not kissing your shoes or anything, just giving you a compliment; please just take it as such. Good people here. And seriously: Thank you again.

    ---Dr. Plasticmask
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 5,888
    I'm probably the most curious and also hope those headphones do the trick with the highs. ;)

    Thanks for letting us know just how blessed we are when it comes to being able to enjoy music so effortlessly without a concern except to playing music too loud.

    I'll be waiting for your review.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!