Possible blown speaker in sda

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Comments

  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 40,508
    dankHugzNY wrote: »
    It followed the speaker not the amp outputs. If I plug the left speaker into the right output it's fine. If I plug the right channel into the left output it pops the same as it did on right output.

    Ok, sorry. Then the problem is with the speaker. Time to open it up.
    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


  • pkquatpkquat Posts: 601
    dankHugzNY wrote: »
    This amp is rated for 4 ohms in Japan under the model A150, in America companies like to cover their asses which is also why that switch is even there, and it's not necessary to flip the switch to 4ohms when using 4ohm speakers.
    This amp can certainly handle intermittent dips and higher demand. It gets no warmer than any other amp I've ever used even after running the sda2a all day at high volume.
    Every 4 ohm speaker will fluctuate.

    There are many reports and articles out there saying to leave the switch in the 8 Ohm position with a good deal of justification, BUT there is also the fine print that most people are missing. #1 don't drive the speakers at high volume at this setting, #2 all speakers are different and some 4 ohm speakers may stress the amplifier too much because their impedance drops to 2 Ohms or less, #3 you may damage your amp by leaving it at the 8 ohm setting. Amplifiers are expecting some resistance. While leaving things in the 8 ohm mode in theory means more power compared to the 4 ohm mode, it can be like a flash flood through a creek when there is no resistance to the flow. That often results in some damage. Check out threads on the infamous "amp killer" Infinity Kappa 9's.

    People understand shorting an amp is bad and can cause damage. That is a 0 ohm load. The closer you get to 0 the greater the chance of damage (Unless you happen to have a certain Mark Levinson amp that doubles as a welder. :p It should also be noted that when welding there is still some resistance.).

    The SDA 2A's dip significantly below 4 Ohm for an extended range, which puts a strain on many amps, especially receivers.

    If your amp still goes into protection mode at with the switch set to 4 ohms then potentially it is a voice coil rub with a short. The speaker will need to be replaced. Does this happen right away or after some listening time? I had a speaker that appeared fine, no voice coil rub, but after listening at a decent volume for a period of time, I heard some odd sounds that were most noticeable during just bass sounds or bass test tones. If I played the same test sounds after everything had been off for a while, I didn't hear anything. Speakers and voice coils do get warm from use, and the voice coil changes dimensions. With use they got a little warm and then the voice coil would rub. When pressing on the speaker I found one direction had much less clearance before the voice coil rubbed. I replaced that speaker.

    As F1Nut mentioned, just throwing another speaker of a similar impedance in there will not work. There is more than just impedance to a speaker. There are differences in the voice coil and suspension. Even if two speakers had identical impedance curves they can perform very differently in the same size cabinet. One speaker may appear to be much more active than the other.

    You are on the right path by swapping the speaker. If it follows the speaker, then that is the issue. As F1Nut mentioned, when you remove it, check for any damage and disconnection from the spider. I would also recommend doing the passive radiator test. Press the passive in and the two speakers should go back to normal in about 2-3 seconds. If they return faster than that, there may be a leak in the cabinet often around one of the speakers or passive. If the suspect speaker returns faster than the other, then that could be the one with he leak. Check to make sure it is tight, the seal is good, and the mounting ring of the basket is not bent. If it takes longer, then there is possibly some damage to the spider.










  • dromundsdromunds Posts: 7,247
    When I first got my 2A's the former owner had Frankenpolked the drivers. I discovered the wrong drivers when I pulled them trying to determine whether the speakers were in fact 2A's or 2B's. I ameliorated the problem by acquiring the correct drivers that I needed, but its not all that uncommon for people to put the wrong drivers in them along the way. I also confirmed they were 2A's by the crossovers.
  • pkquat wrote: »
    dankHugzNY wrote: »
    This amp is rated for 4 ohms in Japan under the model A150, in America companies like to cover their asses which is also why that switch is even there, and it's not necessary to flip the switch to 4ohms when using 4ohm speakers.
    This amp can certainly handle intermittent dips and higher demand. It gets no warmer than any other amp I've ever used even after running the sda2a all day at high volume.
    Every 4 ohm speaker will fluctuate.

    There are many reports and articles out there saying to leave the switch in the 8 Ohm position with a good deal of justification, BUT there is also the fine print that most people are missing. #1 don't drive the speakers at high volume at this setting, #2 all speakers are different and some 4 ohm speakers may stress the amplifier too much because their impedance drops to 2 Ohms or less, #3 you may damage your amp by leaving it at the 8 ohm setting. Amplifiers are expecting some resistance. While leaving things in the 8 ohm mode in theory means more power compared to the 4 ohm mode, it can be like a flash flood through a creek when there is no resistance to the flow. That often results in some damage. Check out threads on the infamous "amp killer" Infinity Kappa 9's.

    People understand shorting an amp is bad and can cause damage. That is a 0 ohm load. The closer you get to 0 the greater the chance of damage (Unless you happen to have a certain Mark Levinson amp that doubles as a welder. :p It should also be noted that when welding there is still some resistance.).

    The SDA 2A's dip significantly below 4 Ohm for an extended range, which puts a strain on many amps, especially receivers.

    If your amp still goes into protection mode at with the switch set to 4 ohms then potentially it is a voice coil rub with a short. The speaker will need to be replaced. Does this happen right away or after some listening time? I had a speaker that appeared fine, no voice coil rub, but after listening at a decent volume for a period of time, I heard some odd sounds that were most noticeable during just bass sounds or bass test tones. If I played the same test sounds after everything had been off for a while, I didn't hear anything. Speakers and voice coils do get warm from use, and the voice coil changes dimensions. With use they got a little warm and then the voice coil would rub. When pressing on the speaker I found one direction had much less clearance before the voice coil rubbed. I replaced that speaker.

    As F1Nut mentioned, just throwing another speaker of a similar impedance in there will not work. There is more than just impedance to a speaker. There are differences in the voice coil and suspension. Even if two speakers had identical impedance curves they can perform very differently in the same size cabinet. One speaker may appear to be much more active than the other.

    You are on the right path by swapping the speaker. If it follows the speaker, then that is the issue. As F1Nut mentioned, when you remove it, check for any damage and disconnection from the spider. I would also recommend doing the passive radiator test. Press the passive in and the two speakers should go back to normal in about 2-3 seconds. If they return faster than that, there may be a leak in the cabinet often around one of the speakers or passive. If the suspect speaker returns faster than the other, then that could be the one with he leak. Check to make sure it is tight, the seal is good, and the mounting ring of the basket is not bent. If it takes longer, then there is possibly some damage to the spider.










    Thank you for that detailed reply. I checked all the drivers, they are all the proper version and look to be in prestine condition.
    I'm going to flip the switch to 4ohm when I go home this weekend and see if it still causes the amp to jump into protection.
    It was at very high volume that the one speaker in one channel made the popping sound.

  • tonybtonyb Posts: 29,956
    edited October 15
    dankHugzNY wrote: »
    It was at very high volume that the one speaker in one channel made the popping sound.

    How high....is high to you ? Like where on the volume dial ?

    Switching the receiver to 4 ohm may protect the receiver, but it does so by limiting the current it puts out. Speakers thrive on current.....see the problem ? Very possible you toasted a driver.
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  • tonyb wrote: »
    dankHugzNY wrote: »
    It was at very high volume that the one speaker in one channel made the popping sound.

    How high....is high to you ? Like where on the volume dial ?

    Switching the receiver to 4 ohm may protect the receiver, but it does so by limiting the current it puts out. Speakers thrive on current.....see the problem ? Very possible you toasted a driver.

    If it's toasted it was already like that, I can crank the left speaker as high as I can take or before it scares me and zero distortion or clipping.
    The dude I bought get them from was using a htib receiver to power them and probably damaged it.

    High volume is indeed subjective. When I got the clicking pop noise in one driver the dial was at 11 o'clock.
  • Tony MTony M Posts: 6,283
    Did you check the spiders?

    A loose spider makes a woofer pop also.
    Most people just listen to music and watch movies. I EXPERIENCE them.
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