Speakers

I have 2 8ohm speakers my amp is 120wpc at 8 ohms and 200wpc at 4 how can I run my speakers at 4 ohms to get the real power I no if I hook up 4 speakers then it be 4ohms a channel.. Do I need a resister or some thing

Comments

  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 18,951
    edited October 7
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 18,951
    This thread has some good discussion (and some bad discussion, too) on the topics of power, loudness, etc.

    http://forum.polkaudio.com/discussion/183636/how-can-you-listen-to-anything-under-200-watt-per-chnl/p1

  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 10,798
    One also needs to remember that speakers are not a steady ohm value. That 8 ohm rating is nominal. Which means that it stays close to 8ohm. They could very well be as high as 12ohm and close to 4ohm in some frequencies. So in theory if you did get another set and do excatly as Doc Hardy suggest it could very well drop below 4ohm in certian frequencies and cause problems with your amp to put it in protection mode.

    Food for thought
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 40,365
    Ya'll are wasting your time.
    Political Correctness'.........defined

    "A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a t-u-r-d by the clean end."


  • Justinthomas1977Justinthomas1977 Posts: 35
    edited October 7
    F1nut wrote: »
    Ya'll are wasting your time.
    I made this post for my 12 yeard old son he just bought a onkyo out of the box kind u no the ones that come allready with speakers it 100wpc each channel it a 6ohm per channel amp he just got some vision acoustic v900 8ohm speakers 260rms 100db sentsivty I just wanted to no. so is he fine wonder what power he is getting to each speaker now

  • Woops is was 2 questions lol wow what the hell I do
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 10,798
    Woops is was 2 questions lol wow what the hell I do

    Well your language conversion system is kind of wonky.....
    Ok it sucks why beat around the bush.
  • Justinthomas1977Justinthomas1977 Posts: 35
    edited October 7
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    Woops is was 2 questions lol wow what the hell I do

    Well your language conversion system is kind of wonky.....
    Ok it sucks why beat around the bush.

    I made this post for my 12 yeard old son he just bought a onkyo out of the box kind u no the ones that come allready with speakers it 100wpc each channel it a 6ohm per channel amp he just got some vision acoustic v900 8ohm speakers 260rms 100db sentsivty I just wanted to no. so is he fine wonder what power he is getting to each speaker now......... Well can u answer this plz for my son
  • Justinthomas1977Justinthomas1977 Posts: 35
    edited October 7
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?
  • machonemachone Posts: 1,003
    ?????
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  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 10,798
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    This has been answered by us many many times dude. It is just ridiculous to keep repackaging your questions in multiple threads multiple times.



    Maybe go chase google for fun!
  • pitdogg2 wrote: »
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    This has been answered by us many many times dude. It is just ridiculous to keep repackaging your questions in multiple threads multiple times.



    Maybe go chase google for fun!

    If u don't like it then don't reply no more internet tough guys wow
  • mlistens03mlistens03 Posts: 2,101
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    This has been answered by us many many times dude. It is just ridiculous to keep repackaging your questions in multiple threads multiple times.



    Maybe go chase google for fun!

    If u don't like it then don't reply no more internet tough guys wow

    We aren’t being internet tough guys. But you’ve asked this question about 10 times in ten different threads. You could look back in any one of those threads and have your answer.
    Not Tom, or Trey, or Jim
    In a few days, it will be...
    NAD C352
    Monitor Audio Radius R90’s/Polk SDA CRS/Mission Freedom 770 IV
    BJC speaker cables, generic RCA’s
    Technics SL3200 turntable and a Shure M97xE phono cartridge
    Velodyne VA-907 subwoofer
    Lafayette LR-1100 acting as a tuner
    TCC-TC750 phono stage
    I've always thought the goal of high end audio was not to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Turn that darn music down' but to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Tell your friends to go home and you can practice later this week'.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 18,951
    edited October 7
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    You could put a noninductive 8 ohm power resistor capable of handling 200 watts continuous* in parallel with your speakers, but all it would do is hasten the death of your power amplifier. It will have no beneficial effect on the sound quality or volume. It is all down side.

    You can teach him a life lesson by doing it -- as long as he is on the hook for buying the replacement amplifier when the one he's using is immolated. If you paid for it, you'll be learning the life lesson.

    Have fun.

    _________________
    * A pair of those would not be inexpensive.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 18,951
    F1nut wrote: »
    Ya'll are wasting your time.

    True, but I am retired, so the relative cost is low (for me).
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 18,951
    edited October 7
    ... (oops)
  • mlistens03 wrote: »
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    This has been answered by us many many times dude. It is just ridiculous to keep repackaging your questions in multiple threads multiple times.



    Maybe go chase google for fun!

    If u don't like it then don't reply no more internet tough guys wow

    We aren’t being internet tough guys. But you’ve asked this question about 10 times in ten different threads. You could look back in any one of those threads and have your answer.

    I just joined and I have 3 total threads
  • mlistens03mlistens03 Posts: 2,101
    mlistens03 wrote: »
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    You can't.

    The power increase is related to the impedance decrease. There's nothing you can do with your current amplifier or speakers that will increase your volume level (assuming that's what you want to do). It doesn't really work that way.

    What you could do, if you really wanted to, is to get another pair of speakers identical to the pair you have, and hook both sets in parallel to your amplifier. That would present a 4 ohm load to your loudspeaker, and could in theory add 3 dB of output (SPL) from your system. For most folks, a 3 dB level increase is barely audible. The lower impedance load would also increase the stress on your amplifier (which may or may not be a serious issue, but if nothing else probably means it will run hotter than with the higher impedance load -- all else being equal).





    I thoght I read some where that u can put some thing in speaker like cap or crossover or resistor or some thing to trick amp in to thinking speaker is 4 ohms I never understanded it that good or maybe I can put one more driver in box to bring down ohms?

    This has been answered by us many many times dude. It is just ridiculous to keep repackaging your questions in multiple threads multiple times.



    Maybe go chase google for fun!

    If u don't like it then don't reply no more internet tough guys wow

    We aren’t being internet tough guys. But you’ve asked this question about 10 times in ten different threads. You could look back in any one of those threads and have your answer.

    I just joined and I have 3 total threads

    Oops, I forgot that there was you and someone else. Sorry, I was thinking about someone else!
    Either way, your other threads do answer this question.
    Not Tom, or Trey, or Jim
    In a few days, it will be...
    NAD C352
    Monitor Audio Radius R90’s/Polk SDA CRS/Mission Freedom 770 IV
    BJC speaker cables, generic RCA’s
    Technics SL3200 turntable and a Shure M97xE phono cartridge
    Velodyne VA-907 subwoofer
    Lafayette LR-1100 acting as a tuner
    TCC-TC750 phono stage
    I've always thought the goal of high end audio was not to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Turn that darn music down' but to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Tell your friends to go home and you can practice later this week'.
  • So can my son run his 8 ohm speakers on his 6 ohm reciver if yes then cool bye lol
  • mlistens03mlistens03 Posts: 2,101
    So can my son run his 8 ohm speakers on his 6 ohm reciver if yes then cool bye lol

    Yes, 8 ohm speakers should be just fine on a 6 ohm receiver. If the impedance was lower, you could have issues, but going up rarely is a problem AFAIK.
    Not Tom, or Trey, or Jim
    In a few days, it will be...
    NAD C352
    Monitor Audio Radius R90’s/Polk SDA CRS/Mission Freedom 770 IV
    BJC speaker cables, generic RCA’s
    Technics SL3200 turntable and a Shure M97xE phono cartridge
    Velodyne VA-907 subwoofer
    Lafayette LR-1100 acting as a tuner
    TCC-TC750 phono stage
    I've always thought the goal of high end audio was not to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Turn that darn music down' but to have your neighbors bang on the wall and say, 'Tell your friends to go home and you can practice later this week'.
  • Viking64Viking64 Posts: 3,240
    mlistens03 wrote: »

    Oops, I forgot that there was you and someone else. Sorry, I was thinking about someone else!
    Either way, your other threads do answer this question.

    It seems that g7trader has a twin brother. :p
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