Original Klipsch RF-7's?

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Comments

  • audioluvraudioluvr Posts: 464
    Get about 100 hours burnt into them before making a decision. I put mine in the TV room for my front drivers. No sub and they sound superb!
    Home System:
    SDA 1C's - Full mod with the help by Dave...
    B&K Reference 50 Pre
    B&K M200 Sonata Monoblocks
    Cambridge Audio DVD 99
    Sangean HD FM Tuner

    Barn system:
    SDA SRS 2.3's Full mod done by myself
    Carver C-1 pre
    Carver M1.5t
  • adam2434adam2434 Posts: 961
    audioluvr wrote: »
    As for my Forte's, even after all the upgrades I did. I can't listen to them long as the mid-horn is just too obnoxious.

    Did you also install Ti diaphragms on the Forte mid and high freq drivers, or are they the stock polymer diaphragms?

    I also find that the Forte (I) can be a bit mid-forward at higher volume with some material. I'm using the stock diaphragms and Dayton Precision caps.

    Interestingly, per Julian Hirsch's review/test of the Forte (1) in '86, they have one of the widest and smoothest frequency responses he ever measured, and one of lowest distortion and highest sensitivity too. In short, a very well-engineered speaker, based on his measurements.
    Polk LS90
    Polk CS400i
    Polk FX500i
    Outlaw LFM-1 Sub
    Polk Monitor 7C (secondary location)
    Pioneer Elite VSX-45TX
    Audiosource Amp Three (2), Amp One/A (1)
    Cambridge Audio C500 Preamp
    Sony 222ES CD/SACD
    MSB Nelson Link III DAC with P1000 Power Supply, Music Hall DAC 25.2
    Squeezebox Classic
    Sony BDP-S1000ES
    JVC DLA-HD250 Projector
    Da-Lite HCCV - 100" Permwall 16:9
    Time Warner HD Cable
    Panamax 500 DBS
    MIT, Blue Jeans, AR, Outlaw Cables
    System Showcase
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 11,154
    edited November 3


    adam2434 wrote: »

    Interestingly, per Julian Hirsch's review/test of the Forte (1) in '86, they have one of the widest and smoothest frequency responses he ever measured, and one of lowest distortion and highest sensitivity too. In short, a very well-engineered speaker, based on his measurements.




    Trust your ears not what is wrote on paper. Over the years i have found many pieces of audio gear that test close to theoretical perfect on paper sounded like poo in real life. When you put cold and sterile gear in front of it, it just compounds the problem
  • adam2434adam2434 Posts: 961
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    Trust your ears not what is wrote on paper. Over the years i have found many pieces of audio gear that test close to theoretical perfect on paper sounded like poo in real life. When you put cold and sterile gear in front of it, it just compounds the problem

    Oh, I agree and believe that measurements only tell part of the story. One's personal taste and ears, as well as the room are big factors.

    But for speakers, I would view a flatter in-room frequency response and low distortion as more desirable than a peaky response with higher distortion.
    Polk LS90
    Polk CS400i
    Polk FX500i
    Outlaw LFM-1 Sub
    Polk Monitor 7C (secondary location)
    Pioneer Elite VSX-45TX
    Audiosource Amp Three (2), Amp One/A (1)
    Cambridge Audio C500 Preamp
    Sony 222ES CD/SACD
    MSB Nelson Link III DAC with P1000 Power Supply, Music Hall DAC 25.2
    Squeezebox Classic
    Sony BDP-S1000ES
    JVC DLA-HD250 Projector
    Da-Lite HCCV - 100" Permwall 16:9
    Time Warner HD Cable
    Panamax 500 DBS
    MIT, Blue Jeans, AR, Outlaw Cables
    System Showcase
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 19,383
    edited November 4
    Distortion in loudspeakers is an interesting topic. Many folks don't realize that essentially all loudspeakers have at least (!) a couple of orders of magnitude more harmonic distortion than do amplifiers. Much of that is in the form of low frequency doubling, but it's true across the audio bandwidth.

    To his credit, Col. Klipsch did understand that. He also understood, or at least believed, that other forms of distortion played an important role in the 'realism' of loudspeaker reproduction of music.

    In terms of keeping levels of harmonic distortion low, Klipsch's strategy was to use drivers with very little diaphragm excursion. The only way to do that, and still have high output, was to horn load, which of course is what he did.

    Klipsch was also a big proponent of minimizing Doppler distortion. Y'all know the Doppler effect -- the frequency of a moving sound source changes (as in the change in pitch of a whistle heard from a passing train). In Klipsch's point of view, any cone driver reproducing frequencies of significantly different wavelengths is subject to Doppler distortion -- the shorter wavelength frequency is riding, like the train whistle on a moving train, on (and affected by) the longer wavelength frequency. This was Klipsch's reasoning for three-way loudspeakers when the standard was still two (or even one).

    As a long-time owner of Klipsch loudspeakers (and many others, some of diametrically opposite design philosophy to the Col's), I would just say that the "truth" is in the ears (neurophysiological auditory processing system!) of the beholder. :)

    ih4xahwas7vv.png
    igc06amekzft.png

    PS FWIW, I espy a McIntosh C8 preamplifier and an HH Scott integrated amplifier (not sure which one, probably a 299) behind the Col. in the photo of him with the see-through K-horn :) The Col. did have fine taste in electronics :)



  • audioluvraudioluvr Posts: 464
    adam2434 wrote: »
    Did you also install Ti diaphragms on the Forte mid and high freq drivers, or are they the stock polymer diaphragms?

    I also find that the Forte (I) can be a bit mid-forward at higher volume with some material. I'm using the stock diaphragms and Dayton Precision caps.

    Interestingly, per Julian Hirsch's review/test of the Forte (1) in '86, they have one of the widest and smoothest frequency responses he ever measured, and one of lowest distortion and highest sensitivity too. In short, a very well-engineered speaker, based on his measurements.

    Bob Crites custom built my crossovers using all new components and Sonicaps. As far as I know the only upgrade for the mid- horn is the A-55G driver. I never upgraded my tweeter diaphragms even though I have them. The stock tweeters sound is quite smooth and pleasing to me after a crossover upgrade. If it wasn't for the cost of the A-55G's I would have installed them by now.

    I used the D. A. Precision's in my SDA 2.3's and REALLY like how they sounded after break in though I think it took a lot longer for those to break in than Sonicaps.
    Home System:
    SDA 1C's - Full mod with the help by Dave...
    B&K Reference 50 Pre
    B&K M200 Sonata Monoblocks
    Cambridge Audio DVD 99
    Sangean HD FM Tuner

    Barn system:
    SDA SRS 2.3's Full mod done by myself
    Carver C-1 pre
    Carver M1.5t
  • la2vegasla2vegas Posts: 2,881
    edited November 5
    mhardy6647 wrote: »
    Distortion in loudspeakers is an interesting topic. Many folks don't realize that essentially all loudspeakers have at least (!) a couple of orders of magnitude more harmonic distortion than do amplifiers. Much of that is in the form of low frequency doubling, but it's true across the audio bandwidth.

    To his credit, Col. Klipsch did understand that. He also understood, or at least believed, that other forms of distortion played an important role in the 'realism' of loudspeaker reproduction of music.

    In terms of keeping levels of harmonic distortion low, Klipsch's strategy was to use drivers with very little diaphragm excursion. The only way to do that, and still have high output, was to horn load, which of course is what he did.

    Klipsch was also a big proponent of minimizing Doppler distortion. Y'all know the Doppler effect -- the frequency of a moving sound source changes (as in the change in pitch of a whistle heard from a passing train). In Klipsch's point of view, any cone driver reproducing frequencies of significantly different wavelengths is subject to Doppler distortion -- the shorter wavelength frequency is riding, like the train whistle on a moving train, on (and affected by) the longer wavelength frequency. This was Klipsch's reasoning for three-way loudspeakers when the standard was still two (or even one).

    As a long-time owner of Klipsch loudspeakers (and many others, some of diametrically opposite design philosophy to the Col's), I would just say that the "truth" is in the ears (neurophysiological auditory processing system!) of the beholder. :)

    ih4xahwas7vv.png
    igc06amekzft.png

    PS FWIW, I espy a McIntosh C8 preamplifier and an HH Scott integrated amplifier (not sure which one, probably a 299) behind the Col. in the photo of him with the see-through K-horn :) The Col. did have fine taste in electronics :)



    uc3hybopuvci.jpg
    Not mine, a local classified.
    2.3TL, 3.1TL, SDA 2B, SDA II, 7B, 7C, 7 series 2, 10B, 5JR+, 5JR, 5A, 4.5, 4, RTA 11TL, RTA 8TL, RTA 8T, LSI9, LSI7 EBONY, LSI7 CHERRY, LSIC, RTI A7, RTI A3, CSI A4, CSI A6, F/XI A4, RTI4. That's all for now.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 19,383
    The Scott amps were pretty good sounding and (by and large) very beautiful. Plus, they hailed from Maynard, MA.

    Coupla-three HH Scott pieces gatherin' dust here - even a few of their early, US made, soiled state pieces.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 19,383
    edited November 5
    Oh, back - sort of - on topic: speaking of amplifiers, PWK is widely reputed to have 'voiced' his Heritage loudspeakers using Brook push-pull 2A3 amplifiers. A bit more powerful, of course, than a single tube, single-ended 2A3 amp, but near legendary for their sound quality.

    12276345056_2fd8632dd5_b.jpgScan_Pic0016 by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
    (yeah, the ad's for their preamplifier, but it's hooked to one of their amps in the photo!)

    4j1xjondcfm0.png
    505bhoz2wn5z.png

    http://www.ampslab.com/vintage_brook12a.htm
    http://www.itishifi.com/2009/12/brook-12a-and-pwk-mod-12a3ki.html

    Full disclosure :)

    r8n902fqc9g5.png
    https://community.klipsch.com/uploads/monthly_10_2013/post-9312-1381933954699.jpg

    EDIT:

    PS Col. Klipsch was famed for his bon mots. This is (IMO, of course), one of his best:
    "What this country needs is a really good five-watt amplifier."
    https://www.stereophile.com/news/11338/index.html

    for more Klipsch wit & wisdom, see:
    https://www.klipsch.com/quotes-anecdotes

    l6few3rq3dy0.png
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