pic test

i1w5l7hdbou1.jpg

Comments

  • oldrockeroldrocker Posts: 1,552
    74y82k82sz95.jpg
  • oldrockeroldrocker Posts: 1,552
    Messing with camera resolution settings.

    Mr. Hardy, you wouldn't happen to know what they gray plug is for?
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 7,397
    edited June 5
    oldrocker wrote: »
    Messing with camera resolution settings.

    Mr. Hardy, you wouldn't happen to know what they gray plug is for?

    Curious also, I see other images of the DM4's on the web, where that gray thing is actually has a black cap...example
    7w9wopvy3o66.jpg

  • oldrockeroldrocker Posts: 1,552
    I just sent Mr. Hardy a pm, maybe he knows. FYI, we played them with the plug in and then out. No difference in the sound. The plug is open on the back side, like a cable might go to it. Was a mystery at the recent GTG enders had.
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 7,397
    edited June 5
    Might email B&W the pic and question if no one here can answer

    May be a port tuner
  • oldrockeroldrocker Posts: 1,552
    Got that on the list to do..
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 13,889
    edited June 5
    Sorry, I was actually interfacing with the Real World for a little bit :/

    Does that plug have two flat blade connectors on it (EDIT: or a blade and a pin*)? It sort of (?) resembles a DIN plug (e.g., as used on European hifi equipment, especially older equipment, from brands such as b&o, Tandberg, etc.).

    EDIT: this sort of thing:

    755432.jpg

    __________
    * heh, yes it does have a blade & pin, doesn't it? :/

    i1w5l7hdbou1.jpg

    Pretty sure its a way to use DIN loudspeaker cabling on that loudspeaker, just as some US-made loudspeakers in former times would have both screw connections and an "RCA" jack for connection. Radio Shack, e.g., commonly did this in the 1960s and into the 70s, and not just on their cheap loudspeakers. The idea was to give "flexibility" in connection options. Nowadays they'd probably call them "cable-agile" ;)

  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 13,889
    Here're some pretty darned typical 1960s European loudspeaker cables :)


    51xk-LFqjhL._SX355_.jpg
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 7,397
    You da' man doc
  • oldrockeroldrocker Posts: 1,552
    Yep, blade pin it is.


    THANKS M!!!
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,559
    interesting Doc
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 13,889
    There's a pair of b&o S45 loudspeakers downstairs that has only DIN connectors on it. Sadly, one of the two speakers' woofers is borked (dragging VC) -- the b&o loudspeakers of that era were pretty nice, actually.

    This Tandberg receiver also has DIN speaker connectors on it (FWIW, and since we're sort of on the subject).

    13380748824_a7d2612c71_b.jpgScott and Tandberg by Mark Hardy, on Flickr
  • rednedtugentrednedtugent Posts: 9,865
    Tip o'cap to Doc on that one!
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 7,397
    It's funny about that being a Euro plug. When I got my pass amp I had a hell of a time pulling the banana plug caps out of the amp.

    I called Pass to confirm that they actually come out and why so tight/difficult.

    Response was because that many of the Euro countries don't allow banana style termination.
  • mhardy6647mhardy6647 Posts: 13,889
    Yup -- the modern take on banana plug safety, though, is just that. Modern.
    "Normal" bananas were still common in (e.g.) the UK in the 1970s -- but the 0.75 inch spaced "double banana plugs" that we (well, some of us) all know and love were anathema in the UK -- because the UK AC mains plugs used a similar enough design that DANGER LURKED in double bananas :(

    I (still) like 'em (double bananas, that is) -- 'cause I am very, very lazy.

    My Polk Audio Monitor Series Model 7s sported double banana plugs on their wiring starting ca. 1979 (i.e., shortly after I got 'em).
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,551
    edited June 19
    Another thing that uses those blade/pin style connectors are La-Z-Boy powered seating. I had to replace several of them on my La-Z-Boy Matinee Theater recliners after the pins broke-off on three of them. Of course once the pin breaks off, it gets stuck in the female connector and is extremely hard to get out. I ended up replacing all of the male and female connectors with new.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 37,306
    fetvaiynpric.jpg
  • ken brydsonken brydson Posts: 6,308
    apcbivna6751.jpg
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