Hearing is believing!!!

13

Comments

  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    Hehe.
  • CoolJazzCoolJazz Posts: 484
    Yep2 wrote: »
    Ive soldered 0 gauge power cable connectors (car audio) my whole life...
    Not easy to "crimp"!

    Of course you can. And it'd be a better connection if you did. Crimping properly is always better than doing a paste job with solder.

    CJ
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    CoolJazz wrote: »
    Yep2 wrote: »
    Ive soldered 0 gauge power cable connectors (car audio) my whole life...
    Not easy to "crimp"!

    Of course you can. And it'd be a better connection if you did. Crimping properly is always better than doing a paste job with solder.

    CJ

    15 years experiece here.
    Your call.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,583
    Golds only attribute is it doesn't tarnish. Silver does but still has all the electrical conductivity BUT it is soft and wears away easily. That is one of the reasons they flash silver with rhodium which is very hard and as you can see doesn't even make the chart.
  • Joey_VJoey_V Posts: 5,701
    Same thing happened to me about a year ago.

    Nonbeliever turned into believer.
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 30
    I used to do a lot of soldering both professionally and as an amateur. I got my Ham radio license at age 13 back in the 70's and learned to solder building Heathkit components for my radio gear.

    After a graduated from high school I got a job with a company called Greenray Industries building electronic oscillators used by the military and some civilian applications. Some were used in the space shuttles and in cruise missiles. The circuit boards were all soldered in wave flux automated machines but we had to occasionally make some tweaks manually and as the final assembly, solder the housings together. The seal had to be perfect and the housings were leak-tested by submerging them in liquid fluorocarbon. If there was even the slightest pinhole you would see air bubbles. In other words you had to be good. No sloppy soldering would have been tolerated.

    We used various types of solder for different applications. Primarily SN60, SN96, and 420 silver solder using soldering irons and torches. The SN60 and SN96 were both rosin core but the 420 silver required acid flux.

    I still do a lot of soldering today with my pinball machine hobby and have multiple soldering stations and a de-soldering station too. It's kind of something I always took for granted but realize a lot of people (especially younger ones) have never soldered anything. Everything is "snap-together" and EZ coupled nowadays per say to remove as much of the skill required that us older dudes had to learn.

    That's why I asked the question about soldering stuff. I personally like to take the extra time to do it, but with audio cables I like the mechanical connection too with the solder as a final step. That way you have the best of both.
  • CoolJazzCoolJazz Posts: 484
    Yep2 wrote: »
    CoolJazz wrote: »
    Yep2 wrote: »
    Ive soldered 0 gauge power cable connectors (car audio) my whole life...
    Not easy to "crimp"!

    Of course you can. And it'd be a better connection if you did. Crimping properly is always better than doing a paste job with solder.

    CJ

    15 years experiece here.
    Your call.
    40 years here. In a broad range of various high voltage and high current applications.

    CJ
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 27,210
    Does the method really matter, crimping/soldering ? To me anyway the only thing that matters is the sound. Crimp it, solder it, encase it in concrete....how does it sound ?

    Over the years, I've seen many claim the solder deteriorates the sound....as they solder onto a connector plated in tin. I've seen some say the quality of the connector is most important.....as they crimp them on to the cheapest wire they can find. That's like putting 3g's worth of tires and rims on a 500 buck beater.

    I'm not saying none of it matters, but you have to start with a quality wire so quality connectors/solder compliment it. Otherwise your just trying to put spit shine on a t u r d. :)
  • lightman1lightman1 Posts: 8,040
    And Tony knows his concrete. Believe you me.... ;)
  • msgmsg Posts: 2,872
    tonyb wrote: »
    To me anyway the only thing that matters is the sound. Crimp it, solder it, encase it in concrete... how does it sound?
    It screams for help until it's covered up?
  • voltzvoltz Posts: 4,382
    Crimping/Soldering? is so old school, Today we use set screws!
  • voltz wrote: »
    Crimping/Soldering? is so old school, Today we use set screws!

    Screws are a screwed up way of crimping.
  • motorstereomotorstereo Posts: 562
    Count me in to in hearing the big difference that MIT cabling makes. To me the increased amount of bass is the most notable and undeniable area of improvement. Enough so that it has made my 18'' sub unnecessary and my 1.2tl's actually sound better without it.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,583
    I like to solder. I do it everywhere i can, that being said i also know there are many places where it just isn't needed. On patch cables i have done both but I've come to love the Canare crimp on RCA's. You must buy a special tool that will set you back some coin but boy are just nice. I once had problems with Cardas RCA's i called and chatted with them (nice folks there) and come to find out i was not getting the RCA near hot enough. I was too afraid i was going to melt the plastic insert that held the pin. The guy on they other end then said before you attemp to solder heat it up with propane torch and if course i thought he was joking but he wasn't things went much smoother after that.
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    So can anyone guess what the eventual use for these odd-looking four-sided components would be?

    The first one to guess the right answer really knows their sheet. lol

    So no one on here has a clue as to what these (unusual-looking for the time) 99.99% pure Russian gold-plated electrical connectors would eventually be used for? The year was 1980-81.

    This is a bit of electronic trivia.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,583
    So Russian Gold is better than U.S. Gold?
    I hear its all the same.....
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 30
    pitdogg2 wrote: »
    So Russian Gold is better than U.S. Gold?
    I hear its all the same.....

    Actually it's an oxymoron. The term "Russian Gold" is an industry name for a gold alloy that consists of 75% gold and 25% copper (aka Rose gold). So why AMP inc. called it "99.99% pure Russian gold" was kind of stupefying. It's hard to understand how an alloy can be 99.99% pure but that's what they called it back then.

    But as for the the question posted... no one on here even has a clue to what this high-tech project was for?
  • rednedtugentrednedtugent Posts: 9,880
    edited April 30
    PinBall machines?
    IBM 360?
    how many guesses to I get?
    oh wait, the IBM PC?
  • afterburntafterburnt Posts: 2,923
    So can anyone guess what the eventual use for these odd-looking four-sided components would be?

    The first one to guess the right answer really knows their sheet. lol

    So no one on here has a clue as to what these (unusual-looking for the time) 99.99% pure Russian gold-plated electrical connectors would eventually be used for? The year was 1980-81.

    This is a bit of electronic trivia.

    VGER
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 30
    PinBall machines?
    IBM 360?
    how many guesses to I get?
    oh wait, the IBM PC?

    redned has it!

    The four-sided chip carrier and socket that we were developing in 1980-81 was to contain the CPU microprocessor chip for the 1st IBM PCs that would come out a few years later. It was used by Intel up to the 286 CPU I believe. You still see them today used for smaller microprocessors.

  • DonnerUndBlitzenDonnerUndBlitzen Posts: 850
    mrloren wrote: »
    I just ordered some 10 gauge wire from Douglas Connection and am hoping for the best.

    Doug's 10AWG Furez is good wire. Do yourself a favor and use a good end to terminate with. I had GLS locking bananas and changed over to Audioquest silver BFA and it is a HELLO from my speakers.

    I need to call Doug and order a few more feet to make jumpers with.

    I went from HD lamp cord, it was ok. Then it was Monster XP and again a little better. Then Monoprice 12AWG with GLS locking banana, ok we're good. Now it's 10awg Furez with Audioquest BFA, oh yeah I am good for the equipment I have.

    I used Mediabridge deadbolt banana plugs for the Douglas Furez 10 gauge wire. The wire barely fit through the center channel hole of those plugs. These plugs are are rated for up to 10 gauge wire. They are gold plated over brass. They have crimping teeth and form a very solid connection with the wire and with my speakers and receiver. I like them better than similar Monoprice banana plugs I'm also using (easier to use). I bought enough wire from Douglas for my L C R speakers and I will use 12 gauge OFC CL2 for my two surrounds. I won't be making jumpers or buying pricey banana plugs/spades for at least a year or two.

    I listened to many of my favorite recordings since last Saturday with the Furez wire and my system still sounds wonderful. This morning I listened for several hours at low level -45 db (Wings Over America, Band on the Run, etc) and the speakers are still clear and detailed at low volumes. Then I put on some very loud music - Rush Moving Pictures and cranked it up to very loud (-32.5 db) and even louder (-27.5 db) and at loud levels still wonderful. I'm happy with my speaker wires. I got the 33 year old stuff that had turned green out of my system last year. Until the last few months, I had not really thought too much about speaker wire and just took it for granted.
  • msgmsg Posts: 2,872
    So can anyone guess what the eventual use for these odd-looking four-sided components would be?
    The first one to guess the right answer really knows their sheet. lol
    So no one on here has a clue as to what these (unusual-looking for the time) 99.99% pure Russian gold-plated electrical connectors would eventually be used for? The year was 1980-81.
    This is a bit of electronic trivia.
    I was going to ask - I thought I said, well, don't keep us in suspense
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited May 1
    CoolJazz wrote: »
    Yep2 wrote: »
    CoolJazz wrote: »
    Yep2 wrote: »
    Ive soldered 0 gauge power cable connectors (car audio) my whole life...
    Not easy to "crimp"!

    Of course you can. And it'd be a better connection if you did. Crimping properly is always better than doing a paste job with solder.

    CJ

    15 years experiece here.
    Your call.
    40 years here. In a broad range of various high voltage and high current applications.

    CJ

    30 yrs electrical exp. here, 15 yrs making audio cables.
    I need a breathalyzer on my computer . :p
    I get a little carried away under the influence. :(
    No worries here, different strokes and all that...

  • rednedtugentrednedtugent Posts: 9,880
    "gold plated over brass"
    I hate the idea of G over B

    Anyone take the rhodium route?
    Starting w/ the $250 wallplug??
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited May 1
    I like a little Rhodium, but like silver, a little goes along way.
    IMHO it gets cold & sterile if used too much.
    I use it on my digital AC power cable with no complaints.
  • mrlorenmrloren Posts: 828
    edited May 1
    mrloren wrote: »
    I just ordered some 10 gauge wire from Douglas Connection and am hoping for the best.

    Doug's 10AWG Furez is good wire. Do yourself a favor and use a good end to terminate with. I had GLS locking bananas and changed over to Audioquest silver BFA and it is a HELLO from my speakers.

    I need to call Doug and order a few more feet to make jumpers with.

    I went from HD lamp cord, it was ok. Then it was Monster XP and again a little better. Then Monoprice 12AWG with GLS locking banana, ok we're good. Now it's 10awg Furez with Audioquest BFA, oh yeah I am good for the equipment I have.

    I used Mediabridge deadbolt banana plugs for the Douglas Furez 10 gauge wire. The wire barely fit through the center channel hole of those plugs. These plugs are are rated for up to 10 gauge wire. They are gold plated over brass. They have crimping teeth and form a very solid connection with the wire and with my speakers and receiver. I like them better than similar Monoprice banana plugs I'm also using (easier to use). I bought enough wire from Douglas for my L C R speakers and I will use 12 gauge OFC CL2 for my two surrounds. I won't be making jumpers or buying pricey banana plugs/spades for at least a year or two.

    I listened to many of my favorite recordings since last Saturday with the Furez wire and my system still sounds wonderful. This morning I listened for several hours at low level -45 db (Wings Over America, Band on the Run, etc) and the speakers are still clear and detailed at low volumes. Then I put on some very loud music - Rush Moving Pictures and cranked it up to very loud (-32.5 db) and even louder (-27.5 db) and at loud levels still wonderful. I'm happy with my speaker wires. I got the 33 year old stuff that had turned green out of my system last year. Until the last few months, I had not really thought too much about speaker wire and just took it for granted.

    I thought I was there with the GLS G over B locking plugs. Switching to the Silver Audioquest plugs made a nice difference. You can do you front 3 for $60 with the Audioquest. I would like to use the silver Furez Doug sells but that's $150 for the front 3.

    Rush moving pictures, what a great CD/LP, one of my favorites along with 2112 and Queensrych Empire. I can never get tired of those.

    -27.5db loud? wow I normally have mine around -15db or so. Yes that does get the wall shaking a bit.
  • DonnerUndBlitzenDonnerUndBlitzen Posts: 850
    That Rush disc has been "remastered." Many a great recording has been ruined by "remastering." The Electric Light Orchestra "Out of the Blue" has had the volume pumped up thru remastering. Often the bass gets artificially jacked way up and the overall recording is almost at the distortion red line. They will use leveling to set the limit near the red line and bring up the levels throughout the music. Music s/b dynamic with lows and highs. I love the piano forte effect in classical music. I had the original Rush lp and don't recall if it was as loud as the cd version. If remastering is to fix a bad analog to digital conversion/xfer I'm good with that, but if they want to make the 70s sound like the overdone, overbaked bass tastes of today that is bogus.

    My receiver is rated at a solid 75 watts, but my apartment is only 750 sq feet. Bigger amp for a larger space is often needed. Since I got my new DAC last summer, I've only had my amp up to a ridiculously loud -20 db for a couple of minutes. If that sound level did not kill me, my neighbors would. The RTI A5s are easy to drive.

    Before I do anything else with the speaker wire/banana plugs/spades I first want to buy a new AVR and BD player. To many side trips buying this or that and not enough $ for the big items. I've done pretty good at not taking too many side trips. It is hard not to be an impulse buyer! The spenders motto: "A penny saved is a half cent lost to inflation."


  • DSkipDSkip Posts: 12,904
    Yep2 wrote: »
    I like a little Rhodium, but like silver, a little goes along way.
    IMHO it gets cold & sterile if used too much.
    I use it on my digital AC power cable with no complaints.

    I don't agree completely. I think once you start moving into higher end speakers, silver loses its edge and instead provides greater details throughout the range. I'm not sure exactly where that threshold is, but I do think there is one. Maybe it's just Wireworlds silver I don't know. Every piece I've added to the chain with silver has brought an immediate improvement with no detrimental effects.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    DSkip wrote: »
    Yep2 wrote: »
    I like a little Rhodium, but like silver, a little goes along way.
    IMHO it gets cold & sterile if used too much.
    I use it on my digital AC power cable with no complaints.

    I don't agree completely. I think once you start moving into higher end speakers, silver loses its edge and instead provides greater details throughout the range. I'm not sure exactly where that threshold is, but I do think there is one. Maybe it's just Wireworlds silver I don't know. Every piece I've added to the chain with silver has brought an immediate improvement with no detrimental effects.

    I like silver!
    Rhodium is cold & stetile to me.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited May 1
    Oops ..Double post.
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