Hearing is believing!!!

24

Comments

  • afterburntafterburnt Posts: 2,923
    I spent all of my cable money on music, now I am spending all of my cable money on a whole new 2 channel system. I should start catching up unless I have to have to get another Universal player.
  • mrlorenmrloren Posts: 828
    I would just use the Furez and terminate with these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B019QRQYSO/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A17IVE6SUAZA2P

    Might be good to use the same wire as is running to the speaker. Just makes me err I only ordered enough for my speakers and didn't think of jumpers.
  • mrloren wrote: »
    I would just use the Furez and terminate with these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B019QRQYSO/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A17IVE6SUAZA2P

    Might be good to use the same wire as is running to the speaker. Just makes me err I only ordered enough for my speakers and didn't think of jumpers.

    Can one simply use a short piece of bare wire as a jumper or are spades required?
  • mrlorenmrloren Posts: 828
    mrloren wrote: »
    I would just use the Furez and terminate with these https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B019QRQYSO/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A17IVE6SUAZA2P

    Might be good to use the same wire as is running to the speaker. Just makes me err I only ordered enough for my speakers and didn't think of jumpers.

    Can one simply use a short piece of bare wire as a jumper or are spades required?

    Yes you can use bare wire but it is suggested not to.

    Bare wire will be exposed, copper corrodes fairly easy. I use to use only bare wire for my connections till I pulled one out of the post one day and the wire was green. It was the monster cable I use to have. A friend said to use banana plugs. Put the plug on get the screws set and use heat shrink to cover it. When I pulled the GLS plugs off my Furez it still looked new after 2 years.
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    Is it better to solder connectors to cables or use one of the many screw-clamp type connectors. I would think a good solder job would be the best but don't see as many solder-only type plugs or spade connectors for audio cables.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,583
    Is it better to solder connectors to cables or use one of the many screw-clamp type connectors. I would think a good solder job would be the best but don't see as many solder-only type plugs or spade connectors for audio cables.

    I've done it both ways, i like to use the screw down type for the convenience of being able to easily switch out if needed. If you heat shrink the connector and cable after it helps to keep exposure to to the atmosphere at a bare minimum. My method is to use deoxit gold on the bare wire before i stuff the absolute most wire possible into the connector. I've had the worst luck on the standard BFA type of connector. They had in my experience either folded up from the weight of the wire or lost spring tension after awhile. I have preferred the better spring type bananas. Douglas connection carries some excellent Furez BFA type that have a polymer type of insert that both helps the spring pressure and bending problems. I have not used but he and I talked at length once about them at one time. There is both screw lock and solder type on his site.
  • mrlorenmrloren Posts: 828
    I never had a problem with BFA plugs. I have the cheap brass want-a-be gold easton on my bedroom HT with Monoprice 12AWG.

    I just made some Monoprice 12AWG with easton BFA for a friend. The center on his receiver is push pin, I was wondering why I saved all of those monster crimp pins

    ylvusvqcyvk3.jpg


  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    I always thought that a mixture of both would be the best where you crimp the connector to the wire and then solder it afterwards for a permanent electro-mechanical connection.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 37,329
    mrloren wrote: »
    I never had a problem with BFA plugs. I have the cheap brass want-a-be gold easton on my bedroom HT with Monoprice 12AWG.

    I just made some Monoprice 12AWG with easton BFA for a friend. The center on his receiver is push pin, I was wondering why I saved all of those monster crimp pins

    ylvusvqcyvk3.jpg


    That cable is going to turn green.
  • helipilotdoughelipilotdoug Posts: 1,045
    Is it better to solder connectors to cables or use one of the many screw-clamp type connectors. I would think a good solder job would be the best but don't see as many solder-only type plugs or spade connectors for audio cables.

    Want to know a little secret? I NEVER use solder for speaker cable connectors. Some manufacturers use it, but when I did some research testing soldered vs non soldered connections, found the non soldered to have better clarity all across the sound spectrum. Also found tighter bass with non soldered. So, when we make speaker cables and bi-wire jumpers no solder is used.
  • afterburntafterburnt Posts: 2,923
    Solder is tin and lead. No wonder I like Jimmy Page.
  • F1nutF1nut Posts: 37,329
    I solder all my connections. If it's good enough for MIT, Shunyata and PS Audio it's good enough for me.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    F1nut wrote: »
    I solder all my connections. If it's good enough for MIT, Shunyata and PS Audio it's good enough for me.
    ^^^^This +1!
    Cheap insurance it will last, zero issues.
  • pitdogg2pitdogg2 Posts: 6,583
    edited April 29
    I always thought that a mixture of both would be the best where you crimp the connector to the wire and then solder it afterwards for a permanent electro-mechanical connection.

    There's no need to solder after a good crimp. In most instances you will not get much solder to flow into the area IME. Getting a connector hot enough to flow the solder into a tight crimp will more than likely make the temper it had nonexistent. Once again IMHO
  • DarqueKnightDarqueKnight Posts: 6,039
    Is it better to solder connectors to cables or use one of the many screw-clamp type connectors. I would think a good solder job would be the best but don't see as many solder-only type plugs or spade connectors for audio cables.
    Want to know a little secret? I NEVER use solder for speaker cable connectors. Some manufacturers use it, but when I did some research testing soldered vs non soldered connections, found the non soldered to have better clarity all across the sound spectrum. Also found tighter bass with non soldered. So, when we make speaker cables and bi-wire jumpers no solder is used.

    Solder is mostly tin, and tin is far less conductive than silver or copper. Large solder connections are far more electrically noisy than a high pressure mechanical connection, which is why AudioQuest uses screw down connections on their speaker cable terminations and why PS Audio uses pressure welding on their power cable terminations.

    On printed circuit boards, the traces are copper, but the leads of most components are steel, and tin is a little more conductive than steel. However, in the case of component leads and component solder joints, the lower conductivity of tin and steel is mitigated by the relatively short paths and very small amounts of solder used. The best solders add a small amount of silver to improve conductivity...and sound.

    Metal%20Conductivity%20Relative%20To%20Silver_zpsewcwbjsp.jpg

  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    I use Cardas quad or Wbt silver solder.
    Made hundreds of cables with zero issue.
    Crimping in general is not as reliable.
    Corrosion comes into play with crimping.
    No worries here, but I prefer solder.
    Personal preference.
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 29
    If you read my post I stated that I crimp the connector first (which makes the electrical contact) and then solder it afterwards to add mechanical strength (and corrosion resistance) so I would think in this situation the electrical properties of solder would be irrelevant since the actual electrical contact is being made by the connector - not by solder alone.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    If you read my post I stated that I crimp the connector first (which makes the electrical contact) and then solder it afterwards to add mechanical strength (and corrosion resistance) so I would think in this situation the electrical properties of solder would be irrelevant since the actual electrical contact is being made by the connector - not by solder alone.

    Nothing wrong with that.
    I have some banana plugs you cant crimp (older Nordost Z plugs) & there is no need to crimp.
    Solder only required.

  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    You can solder all of them, but cant crimp all of them.
  • CoolJazzCoolJazz Posts: 484
    They trick to crimps is to have the right crimp tool. Not "a" crimp tool. The right crimp tool.

    CJ
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    CoolJazz wrote: »
    They trick to crimps is to have the right crimp tool. Not "a" crimp tool. The right crimp tool.

    CJ

    Ok, but you can solder ANY connector.
    Can't crimp every connector tho...
    Are you drunker than me? :p
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    Ive soldered 0 gauge power cable connectors (car audio) my whole life...
    Not easy to "crimp"!
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    One of my other hobbies is restoring early solid-state pinball machines (1976-1985). The first thing I always do right off the bat whenever I buy a 40 year old pinball machine is to replace every terminal in the Molex connectors. These are tiny .100 & .156 style terminals and there are over 100 per machine to do. They take a special Molex crimper.

    After you do a few thousand, you get the hang of it pretty-good. You have to strip the correct amount of insulation from each wire and then crimp them properly. It's back-breaking work bent-over inside the machine doing it. I usually do about 20 at a time and then take a break. After a beer or two I go back and do another batch. Eventually I get them all done.

    This is the most-important thing you need to do to get these machines up and running reliably again. After 40 years the terminals are always tarnished and/or bent to the point they no longer make good contact with the pins on the circuit boards.
  • mrlorenmrloren Posts: 828
    F1nut wrote: »
    mrloren wrote: »
    I never had a problem with BFA plugs. I have the cheap brass want-a-be gold easton on my bedroom HT with Monoprice 12AWG.

    I just made some Monoprice 12AWG with easton BFA for a friend. The center on his receiver is push pin, I was wondering why I saved all of those monster crimp pins

    ylvusvqcyvk3.jpg


    That cable is going to turn green.

    yes it will sooner or later, I did the ones in my bedroom HT the same way over 2 years ago. still no green yet... and I said yet.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    One of my other hobbies is restoring early solid-state pinball machines (1976-1985). The first thing I always do right off the bat whenever I buy a 40 year old pinball machine is to replace every terminal in the Molex connectors. These are tiny .100 & .156 style terminals and there are over 100 per machine to do. They take a special Molex crimper.

    After you do a few thousand, you get the hang of it pretty-good. You have to strip the correct amount of insulation from each wire and then crimp them properly. It's back-breaking work bent-over inside the machine doing it. I usually do about 20 at a time and then take a break. After a beer or two I go back and do another batch. Eventually I get them all done.

    This is the most-important thing you need to do to get these machines up and running reliably again. After 40 years the terminals are always tarnished and/or bent to the point they no longer make good contact with the pins on the circuit boards.

    That is cool , but you might consider point to point wiring with barrier strips.
    Eliminate the Molex.
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 29
    Yep2 wrote: »

    That is cool , but you might consider point to point wiring with barrier strips.
    Eliminate the Molex.

    Naw that ain't how it works in pinball. It just isn't done that way. You need the connectors to be able to replace the boards easily. It would make it almost impossible to diagnose problems or repair individual circuit boards if you had to un-solder everything every time you have an issue. It would be like hard-wiring all the boards in your PC. It would work great until you have a problem. Then you'd be screwed.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    edited April 29
    DMM point to point on a barrier strip wouldnt be easier to test than a Molex connector?
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 29
    You don't test Molex connectors. They are there to allow the user to quickly and easily remove the various boards. Plug and play.
  • Yep2Yep2 Posts: 412
    You don't test Molex connectors. They are there to allow the user to quickly and easily remove the various boards.

    So are barrier strips.
    But you can test a barrier strip ALOT EASIER!
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,564
    edited April 29

    Metal%20Conductivity%20Relative%20To%20Silver_zpsewcwbjsp.jpg

    That chart on conductivity is interesting. I always had the impression that gold was a better conductor than silver but never really looked it up.

    Back in the early 1980's I worked for AMP Inc. in the prototype model shop manufacturing electrical connectors. We would insert-mold the connectors in a plastic injection molding process and then form the lugs and terminate them.

    I vividly remember a cool project we had back then. We were manufacturing prototype IC chip carriers and sockets. The chip carriers were square with legs on all four sides and they would snap into a square female socket that was to be soldered onto a circuit board. We would mold the chip carriers and then they would go to a secondary operation where these women would manually wire-bond a silicon chip in the center of them using microscopes.

    The chips were wire-bonded to the carriers using .002" diameter wire made from 99.99% pure Russian gold. As you can imagine, it was a painstakingly-slow manual operation but it was in the developmental prototype stage. The legs of the chip carriers and the sockets were also plated with 99.99% pure Russian gold. This was at a high-security facility in Harrisburg, PA.

    At the time none of us working on this project really knew exactly what these four-sided chip carriers and sockets were to be used for? To us back then it was just another high-tech connector project. For all we knew they could have been used in the space shuttle or nuclear missiles.

    Prior to this project the majority of the chip carriers we were making were the rectangular "DIP" style with legs on two sides.

    So can anyone guess what the eventual use for these odd-looking four-sided components would be?

    The first one to guess the right answer really knows their sheet. lol
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