Ripping to a NAS?? Taking too long??

Ripping can be time consuming and often is. I am filing my NAS which has 2 10TB Seagate iron wolf drives. 2-10's doesn't get me 20TB, as they mirror each other and now when I set up to rip a batch, (and the batches are usually no less than 100 and often more) I set up both laptops and have at it. Twice as fast and no issues doing it. Just passing it along as ya never know who else is at it on my level......BTW my level can be summed up with one word

INSANITY!! :)

Happy Ripping

THJ
"if it's not fun, it's not worth it!!" "Smile & Stay Warm!!"
*****************************
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Comments

  • ZLTFULZLTFUL Posts: 4,198
    You only have 10TB? I am up to 76TBs as of today... >:)

    On a more serious note, I can relate. I added 2 Blu Ray drives to one of my servers so that I can rip 3 Blu Rays or DVDs or CDs at once. Has made a big dent in my recovery work from losing one of my drive arrays a few months ago.
    "Some people find it easier to be conceited rather than correct."

    "Unwad those panties and have a good time man. We're all here to help each other, no matter how it might appear." DSkip
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  • mrbironmrbiron Posts: 4,477
    76TB eh........That sure is a lot of storage.
    I bet you have a copy of Suburban Commando in there somewhere...If not, you should ;)
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  • tophatjohnnytophatjohnny Posts: 1,945
    ZLTFUL wrote: »
    You only have 10TB? I am up to 76TBs as of today... >:)

    On a more serious note, I can relate. I added 2 Blu Ray drives to one of my servers so that I can rip 3 Blu Rays or DVDs or CDs at once. Has made a big dent in my recovery work from losing one of my drive arrays a few months ago.

    And I thought I was insane, but on the real...when you actually get to having 10TB's worth of Albums ripped in FLAC, do get with me on the network sharing that we're able to do with the NAS route. Looking forward to trying that!
    "if it's not fun, it's not worth it!!" "Smile & Stay Warm!!"
    *****************************
  • DollarDaveDollarDave Posts: 2,494
    Ironically, I bought a netgear nas last week. It was so damn slow I sent it back. It's software sucked, too.

    This week, I bought a synology nas and used the same 3 3TB iron wolf drives and it is blazingly fast.. I'm running raid 5. The software suit is pretty good.

    Im using JRiver for ripping and media server.

    I have questions on how to playback dvds and blurays, but that's for another thread.
  • lightman1lightman1 Posts: 8,709
    Tell me more of this thing you call "ripping music" to NAS......curious... ;)
  • lightman1lightman1 Posts: 8,709
    Bootlegs!
  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    edited March 30
    THJ - on a mission to rip every cd known to man, just in case B)

    I sure hope you don't discover a problem with your rip configuration, or discover some preferred option. That's annoying even with just the 12 I got on the deal from Columbia House.
  • Erik TracyErik Tracy Posts: 4,691
    Just remember - RAID is not a backup.

    That's alot of time and data to lose without a backup scheme in place that works.

    H9: If you don't trust what you are hearing, then maybe you need to be less invested in a hobby which all the pleasure comes from listening to music.
  • ZLTFULZLTFUL Posts: 4,198
    Nobody ever claimed RAID was a backup solution. It is simply redundancy in the event of hardware (drive) failure.

    But there isn't really a cost effective consumer level backup solution for multiple TBs of data.
    I checked with Amazon and Google for cloud backup options for my current data and the cost is quite literally tens of thousands of dollars *A MONTH*.

    In my work environment, we have 14 days of backups of all of our prod hosts along with 90 days worth of backups for our file servers. But even that isn't cost effective in a consumer environment because we are talking multiple UCS environments dedicated *ONLY* to backups.

    Most consumers aren't even worried about backup of things like movies and music. Most consumers are worried about pictures and financial records and the like. All of our photos, documents, home videos and the like are saved to a NAS on site and also to a USB drive once a month that is stored off site in a safe deposit box. And honestly, that is quite a bit more than the average consumer is going to do.

    But it all boils down to what works/is affordable/meets the individual's needs on a case by case basis.

    As annoying as it was to have to re-rip ~600 Blu-rays, it was all relative in the grand scheme of things.
    "Some people find it easier to be conceited rather than correct."

    "Unwad those panties and have a good time man. We're all here to help each other, no matter how it might appear." DSkip
    2 Channel: Silverline Audio Sonatina MKI, Monitor 5 Series II, DIY Seas based bookies
    LR 2 Channel: LSi7, DSW-MP2000
    HT: JTR Triple 8 LCRs, DIYSG Volt 8LX Surrounds, DIYSG Volt 6LX Atmos, 6 SI HT-18D2 Subs
    Guest BR 2 Channel: Swans D1080MKII
    Deck: Pyle BT Speaker pair with upgraded woofers
  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    Some people do think RAID is synonymous with backup, unfortunately.

    Maybe my math is off, but Amazon Glacier for 76TB looks like around $300/mo? Sounds like your data is mostly static, so, not sure you need S3 for infrequent changes, and with Glacier I think you only pay more for retrieval, which you'd only be doing under catastrophic failure?

    I know someone who uses CrashPlan. Unlimited, not sure of the subscription fee, but supposed to be affordable.
  • lightman1lightman1 Posts: 8,709
    Scott....I have seen Ryans home server setup. Most startup app developers would kill to have it.
  • EndersShadowEndersShadow Posts: 14,939
    RYAN is renting space to the NSA, the Clinton foundation, The Democratic & Republican National Conventions.......

    Wait a minute.... I see a pattern...
    "....not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." William Bruce Cameron, Informal Sociology: A Casual Introduction to Sociological Thinking (1963)
  • ZLTFULZLTFUL Posts: 4,198
    There is also a second consideration @msg and that is network bandwidth. Transferring that much data with a 5Mbps upload limitation (unfortunately, fiber options won't be available where we are at for at least a couple of years) is painful.

    Backblaze offers unlimited backup storage with unlimited versions for $95 for 2 years. A viable option...IF I was talking about a few hundred GBs to a couple of TBs.
    "Some people find it easier to be conceited rather than correct."

    "Unwad those panties and have a good time man. We're all here to help each other, no matter how it might appear." DSkip
    2 Channel: Silverline Audio Sonatina MKI, Monitor 5 Series II, DIY Seas based bookies
    LR 2 Channel: LSi7, DSW-MP2000
    HT: JTR Triple 8 LCRs, DIYSG Volt 8LX Surrounds, DIYSG Volt 6LX Atmos, 6 SI HT-18D2 Subs
    Guest BR 2 Channel: Swans D1080MKII
    Deck: Pyle BT Speaker pair with upgraded woofers
  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    Oh yeah, from what we've discussed of it, impressive to say the least, absolutely. It's more robust than what some technical small businesses I know are running. Not to say protecting that data is impossible or even impractical, though. Ten 8TB USB 3.0 WD MyBook externals would cost around $2100. Not exactly cheap, and not even ideal, but for static data, disk storage may make more sense than hosted, since the break even point would be reached in a matter of months. Or even just bare disks and a dock, never mind a finished. enclosure.

    As Ryan said, it all boils down to loss tolerance. The greater the tolerance for loss, the less protection required, and the lower the cost.

    For you guys, though, I'd recommend grabbing a free trial of WinRAR, and hit Ebay for some new old stock floppies, and have at it. You should have your data backed up right about the time John finishes ripping the last cd on the planet.
  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    edited March 31
    Seed drives. Multiple runs as necessary.
    Come on, man, there's no excuse for no backup. you know better :)
    (I say this as I troubleshoot today my secondary backup disk for offloading Acronis snapshots. Out of the blue, starts throwing errors.)
    ZLTFUL wrote: »
    There is also a second consideration @msg and that is network bandwidth. Transferring that much data with a 5Mbps upload limitation (unfortunately, fiber options won't be available where we are at for at least a couple of years) is painful.

    Backblaze offers unlimited backup storage with unlimited versions for $95 for 2 years. A viable option...IF I was talking about a few hundred GBs to a couple of TBs.
    Post edited by msg on
  • tophatjohnnytophatjohnny Posts: 1,945
    Sheez....and all I was doing was trying to share a quicker way to rip to the NAS units :) but I'm a new comer at it and will always consider myself a beginner with it all and love to learn new things. I started the ripping like many do..with a basic USB hard drive and through many hours of testing this format VS: that format, I have my settings honed in now to what I know beyond any doubt to be the be highest level possible without compromising quality of the recordings. That recipe is something best left to the individual that is on a similar journey. As for backing up...my NAS is only a 2 Bay unit and the drives mirror each other, meaning if one drive fails (heaven forbid) the other drive still has all the files and I would just need to replace the failed drive. In the case and again (heaven forbid) my home goes up in flames, there will be far more worries than my music to deal with. On another tip for backing up files, Synology offers it's users a free app that is cloud storage so looking into that soon. Like I said I am a beginner and on a quest to build one heck of a music library that already is pretty tough and growing like a weed!!

    Rip on brothers.

    BTW the program I found through a member here is Easy CD converter and I did pay for the program. Very user friendly and I just love it. That's all I can share at this point.
    "if it's not fun, it's not worth it!!" "Smile & Stay Warm!!"
    *****************************
  • ZLTFUL wrote: »
    There is also a second consideration @msg and that is network bandwidth. Transferring that much data with a 5Mbps upload limitation (unfortunately, fiber options won't be available where we are at for at least a couple of years) is painful.

    Backblaze offers unlimited backup storage with unlimited versions for $95 for 2 years. A viable option...IF I was talking about a few hundred GBs to a couple of TBs.

    No one looks over your shoulder when you do the backup. Everyone is looking over your shoulder when you do a restore.

    We setup with onsite for speed and offsite for redundancy. Using redundant UltraStores locally and Amazon Glacier. The way we are setup with the redundancy, if we have to revert to Glacier we are looking at a problem that is going to take time to get back up and running by the time the bulk tier option becomes available for us to start pulling down data.
  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    I hope none of what I've contributed comes across as preachy or rigid. Not intended to. I typically write in a lighter style, but there's only so much you can do to lighten up this kinda stuff. Should probably have added more smileys or somethin', but they start to look pretty teenage-girl-adolescent after a while, and I only do that on Fridays. Wait... #$%*.

    DR (disaster recovery) is a huge concern in IT these days, given vastly lowered tolerance for downtime and expectation of high availability, with budgets that don't always allow for this. Problem is, people generally don't like to spend money on expensive just-in-case doomsday stuff. It's not sexy. It's boring, and people think it won't happen to them, or they'll have new stuff by the time it's a concern. Maybe, maybe not.

    My personal [unsolicited] perspective is that if your data is in any way important to you, there are options for varying levels of protection. Doesn't have to be all or nothing, and it doesn't have to be the best on the market. There are ways to get there with a little time and creativity. I've had failures of my own - more than a few over the years - that forced me to look at my own DR coverage. It can happen to anyone, and it's something I'm seeing more and more often, especially with a lot of people switching to notebooks as primary computers over the years. They get bumped and jostled about; mishandled. Well guess what? That's one of the worst things for a mechanical hard drive and one of the reasons notebooks fail prematurely. SSD (solid state) has become more affordable and is coming on strong and making that less of an issue. Anyway, as Ryan details, he's got a solid plan in place for protecting only his most important data. Everyone can and should at least be doing this much.

    In your case, John, if not backing up that data anywhere else, maybe you can consider having a spare disk on hand - the exact same model as what you're currently using. When rebuilding a RAID array, there's heavy read/write operations between the disks. The concern here is for failure of a second disk under the rebuild process and losing the array entirely. Not as big a concern for newer hardware, but in older disks, last thing you want is to be feeling relieved about catching a bad disk, and then have a second disk pop under the read stress in rebuilding the array. Definitely a good idea to look into cloud. We've talked about this, so quit avoiding it :) Seems to me the best time to start this is when you're in the early stages of amassing data so it's more manageable, otherwise you'll end up like Ryan and break the internet for everyone in trying to backup his library.

    Re: the importance of same disks - This can be rare, but sometimes there can be issues with disk firmware mismatch, and it can corrupt the array. This is why I recommend having a spare disk on hand of the exact same model and firmware. Just depends. Consumer RAID systems may not be as picky, but some enterprise stuff is. Err on the side of caution, I say, but I'm paranoid.

    Sorry for the length/rant. DR is something I'm passionate about. Trying to help prevent people having to suffer the horrible regret of not being protected against hardware failures, and to share that DR isn't just for big business anymore.
  • Erik TracyErik Tracy Posts: 4,691
    edited April 1
    The misconception of mirrored RAID as a 'backup' doesn't protect your data from file system corruption or human error (as in oops - why did I do that - which happens).

    In a mirrored RAID configuration - whatever operation happens on the primary disk happens to the mirror disk. You delete a file, then it's deleted from the mirror.

    RAID mirroring protects you from a disk failure to give you continued access to your data - it enhances 'availability' and reduces downtime to your data because the mirror will 'take over', but it is NOT a "backup".


    H9: If you don't trust what you are hearing, then maybe you need to be less invested in a hobby which all the pleasure comes from listening to music.
  • tonybtonyb Posts: 27,813
    edited April 1
    msg wrote: »
    Sorry for the length/rant. DR is something I'm passionate about. Trying to help prevent people having to suffer the horrible regret of not being protected against hardware failures, and to share that DR isn't just for big business anymore.

    To me, the best protection, the best way to avoid dealing with DR, is to have the physical media as the backup. Those worried about the internet going away or EMT blasts, ;) Hardware failures and corrupted software, losing your files in some fashion.....none of those things would be a concern if....you had the physical media.

    Speaking music files, other data files is a different story.
    legacy Focus 20/20
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  • Erik TracyErik Tracy Posts: 4,691
    But if one's collection approach is downloads - there is no physical media.

    I get your point though - I'll never give up my physical media....ever.

    H9: If you don't trust what you are hearing, then maybe you need to be less invested in a hobby which all the pleasure comes from listening to music.
  • tophatjohnnytophatjohnny Posts: 1,945
    I plan to pick up a couple of SS Drives and a whole new NAS unit before too long and before I do that I will have all my files saved to the provided cloud from Synology. Wasn't going to say that just yet as I'm still building my library and this project will take me a while before I get to the transfer. Then I'll just put the current NAS into storage. Couldn't imaging where I'd store 13K + cd's????????
    "if it's not fun, it's not worth it!!" "Smile & Stay Warm!!"
    *****************************
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,596
    edited April 15
    ZLTFUL wrote: »
    You only have 10TB? I am up to 76TBs as of today... >:)

    Back-up is definitely an issue once you accumulate a library of that size.


    Post edited by Gatecrasher on
    POLK AUDIO SRT
    (Signature Reference Theater)

    2rqdrna.jpg s6k686.jpg 11rgneu.jpg
    SRT 10.2 SYSTEM
    (4) SRT Subs & Satellites
    (2) SRT Center Speakers
    (2) SRT Control Centers w/Remote
    (4) f/x1000 Surrounds
    (2) PSW650 Subs
    Pioneer Elite SC-09TX AVR
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  • msgmsg Posts: 3,500
    Your enclosure looks a little flimsy.
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 8,468
    msg wrote: »
    Your enclosure looks a little flimsy.

    Dell chasis?
    2-channel: Modwright KWI-200 Integrated, Dynaudio C1-II Signatures, Simaudio 780D DAC
    Desktop rig: LSi7, Polk 110sub, Dayens Ampino amp, W4S DAC/pre, Sonos, JRiver
    Gear on standby: Melody 101 tube pre, Modwright LS100, Unison Research Simply Italy Integrated
    Gone to new homes: (Matt Polk's)Threshold Stasis SA12e monoblocks, Pass XA30.5 amp, Usher MD2 speakers, Dynaudio C4 platinum speakers
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,596
    edited April 15
    txcoastal1 wrote: »
    msg wrote: »
    Your enclosure looks a little flimsy.

    Dell chasis?

    Addonics: http://www.addonics.com/

    2ynlztd.jpg
    POLK AUDIO SRT
    (Signature Reference Theater)

    2rqdrna.jpg s6k686.jpg 11rgneu.jpg
    SRT 10.2 SYSTEM
    (4) SRT Subs & Satellites
    (2) SRT Center Speakers
    (2) SRT Control Centers w/Remote
    (4) f/x1000 Surrounds
    (2) PSW650 Subs
    Pioneer Elite SC-09TX AVR
    Pioneer Elite BDP-09FD Blu-Ray
    Pioneer Elite BDP-33FD Blu-Ray (Region-Free)
    Custom HTPC w/Multi-Lane SATA Hot-Swapable Drive RAID Tower
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 8,468
    txcoastal1 wrote: »
    msg wrote: »
    Your enclosure looks a little flimsy.

    Dell chasis?

    Addonics: http://www.addonics.com/

    No fun....you took out the pic of the box
    2-channel: Modwright KWI-200 Integrated, Dynaudio C1-II Signatures, Simaudio 780D DAC
    Desktop rig: LSi7, Polk 110sub, Dayens Ampino amp, W4S DAC/pre, Sonos, JRiver
    Gear on standby: Melody 101 tube pre, Modwright LS100, Unison Research Simply Italy Integrated
    Gone to new homes: (Matt Polk's)Threshold Stasis SA12e monoblocks, Pass XA30.5 amp, Usher MD2 speakers, Dynaudio C4 platinum speakers
  • GatecrasherGatecrasher Posts: 1,596
    What picture?
    POLK AUDIO SRT
    (Signature Reference Theater)

    2rqdrna.jpg s6k686.jpg 11rgneu.jpg
    SRT 10.2 SYSTEM
    (4) SRT Subs & Satellites
    (2) SRT Center Speakers
    (2) SRT Control Centers w/Remote
    (4) f/x1000 Surrounds
    (2) PSW650 Subs
    Pioneer Elite SC-09TX AVR
    Pioneer Elite BDP-09FD Blu-Ray
    Pioneer Elite BDP-33FD Blu-Ray (Region-Free)
    Custom HTPC w/Multi-Lane SATA Hot-Swapable Drive RAID Tower
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 8,468
    3gpi8wtz109o.jpg
    2-channel: Modwright KWI-200 Integrated, Dynaudio C1-II Signatures, Simaudio 780D DAC
    Desktop rig: LSi7, Polk 110sub, Dayens Ampino amp, W4S DAC/pre, Sonos, JRiver
    Gear on standby: Melody 101 tube pre, Modwright LS100, Unison Research Simply Italy Integrated
    Gone to new homes: (Matt Polk's)Threshold Stasis SA12e monoblocks, Pass XA30.5 amp, Usher MD2 speakers, Dynaudio C4 platinum speakers
  • txcoastal1txcoastal1 Posts: 8,468
    Hehehehe
    4tnymy1fl4j8.jpg
    2-channel: Modwright KWI-200 Integrated, Dynaudio C1-II Signatures, Simaudio 780D DAC
    Desktop rig: LSi7, Polk 110sub, Dayens Ampino amp, W4S DAC/pre, Sonos, JRiver
    Gear on standby: Melody 101 tube pre, Modwright LS100, Unison Research Simply Italy Integrated
    Gone to new homes: (Matt Polk's)Threshold Stasis SA12e monoblocks, Pass XA30.5 amp, Usher MD2 speakers, Dynaudio C4 platinum speakers
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